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Concentrations of hormones, pharmaceuticals and other micropollutants in groundwater affected by septic systems in New England and New York

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
65 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
135 Mendeley
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Title
Concentrations of hormones, pharmaceuticals and other micropollutants in groundwater affected by septic systems in New England and New York
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, April 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2014.12.067
Pubmed ID
Authors

P.J. Phillips, C. Schubert, D. Argue, I. Fisher, E.T. Furlong, W. Foreman, J. Gray, A. Chalmers

Abstract

Septic-system discharges can be an important source of micropollutants (including pharmaceuticals and endocrine active compounds) to adjacent groundwater and surface water systems. Groundwater samples were collected from well networks tapping glacial till in New England (NE) and sandy surficial aquifer New York (NY) during one sampling round in 2011. The NE network assesses the effect of a single large septic system that receives discharge from an extended health care facility for the elderly. The NY network assesses the effect of many small septic systems used seasonally on a densely populated portion of Fire Island. The data collected from these two networks indicate that hydrogeologic and demographic factors affect micropollutant concentrations in these systems. The highest micropollutant concentrations from the NE network were present in samples collected from below the leach beds and in a well downgradient of the leach beds. Total concentrations for personal care/domestic use compounds, pharmaceutical compounds and plasticizer compounds generally ranged from 1 to over 20μg/L in the NE network samples. High tris(2-butoxyethyl phosphate) plasticizer concentrations in wells beneath and downgradient of the leach beds (>20μg/L) may reflect the presence of this compound in cleaning agents at the extended health-care facility. The highest micropollutant concentrations for the NY network were present in the shoreline wells and reflect groundwater that is most affected by septic system discharges. One of the shoreline wells had personal care/domestic use, pharmaceutical, and plasticizer concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 5.7μg/L. Estradiol equivalency quotient concentrations were also highest in a shoreline well sample (3.1ng/L). Most micropollutant concentrations increase with increasing specific conductance and total nitrogen concentrations for shoreline well samples. These findings suggest that septic systems serving institutional settings and densely populated areas in coastal settings may be locally important sources of micropollutants to adjacent aquifer and marine systems.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 135 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 3 2%
United States 2 1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 127 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 26%
Researcher 26 19%
Student > Master 19 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 7%
Student > Bachelor 9 7%
Other 22 16%
Unknown 15 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 45 33%
Engineering 22 16%
Chemistry 14 10%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 10 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 6%
Other 10 7%
Unknown 26 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 February 2015.
All research outputs
#1,164,564
of 15,557,520 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#979
of 14,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,759
of 290,609 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#13
of 160 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,557,520 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,355 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,609 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 160 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.