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Dependence of the evolution of carbon dynamics in the northern permafrost region on the trajectory of climate change

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
15 news outlets
blogs
8 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
65 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
180 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
273 Mendeley
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Title
Dependence of the evolution of carbon dynamics in the northern permafrost region on the trajectory of climate change
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, March 2018
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1719903115
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. David McGuire, David M. Lawrence, Charles Koven, Joy S. Clein, Eleanor Burke, Guangsheng Chen, Elchin Jafarov, Andrew H. MacDougall, Sergey Marchenko, Dmitry Nicolsky, Shushi Peng, Annette Rinke, Philippe Ciais, Isabelle Gouttevin, Daniel J. Hayes, Duoying Ji, Gerhard Krinner, John C. Moore, Vladimir Romanovsky, Christina Schädel, Kevin Schaefer, Edward A. G. Schuur, Qianlai Zhuang

Abstract

We conducted a model-based assessment of changes in permafrost area and carbon storage for simulations driven by RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 projections between 2010 and 2299 for the northern permafrost region. All models simulating carbon represented soil with depth, a critical structural feature needed to represent the permafrost carbon-climate feedback, but that is not a universal feature of all climate models. Between 2010 and 2299, simulations indicated losses of permafrost between 3 and 5 million km2for the RCP4.5 climate and between 6 and 16 million km2for the RCP8.5 climate. For the RCP4.5 projection, cumulative change in soil carbon varied between 66-Pg C (1015-g carbon) loss to 70-Pg C gain. For the RCP8.5 projection, losses in soil carbon varied between 74 and 652 Pg C (mean loss, 341 Pg C). For the RCP4.5 projection, gains in vegetation carbon were largely responsible for the overall projected net gains in ecosystem carbon by 2299 (8- to 244-Pg C gains). In contrast, for the RCP8.5 projection, gains in vegetation carbon were not great enough to compensate for the losses of carbon projected by four of the five models; changes in ecosystem carbon ranged from a 641-Pg C loss to a 167-Pg C gain (mean, 208-Pg C loss). The models indicate that substantial net losses of ecosystem carbon would not occur until after 2100. This assessment suggests that effective mitigation efforts during the remainder of this century could attenuate the negative consequences of the permafrost carbon-climate feedback.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 65 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 273 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 273 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 65 24%
Researcher 58 21%
Student > Master 34 12%
Student > Bachelor 16 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 4%
Other 31 11%
Unknown 59 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 67 25%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 56 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 35 13%
Engineering 7 3%
Social Sciences 4 1%
Other 21 8%
Unknown 83 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 196. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 October 2021.
All research outputs
#130,470
of 19,993,704 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#2,876
of 93,567 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,930
of 294,474 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#81
of 1,033 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,993,704 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 93,567 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 294,474 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,033 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.