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Estimates of alcohol-related oesophageal cancer burden in Japan: systematic review and meta-analyses

Overview of attention for article published in Bulletin of the World Health Organization, February 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source

Citations

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25 Dimensions

Readers on

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51 Mendeley
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Title
Estimates of alcohol-related oesophageal cancer burden in Japan: systematic review and meta-analyses
Published in
Bulletin of the World Health Organization, February 2015
DOI 10.2471/blt.14.142141
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael Roerecke, Kevin D Shield, Susumu Higuchi, Atsushi Yoshimura, Elisabeth Larsen, Maximilien X Rehm, Jürgen Rehm

Abstract

To refine estimates of the burden of alcohol-related oesophageal cancer in Japan. We searched PubMed for published reviews and original studies on alcohol intake, aldehyde dehydrogenase polymorphisms, and risk for oesophageal cancer in Japan, published before 2014. We conducted random-effects meta-analyses, including subgroup analyses by aldehyde dehydrogenase variants. We estimated deaths and loss of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) from oesophageal cancer using exposure distributions for alcohol based on age, sex and relative risks per unit of exposure. We identified 14 relevant studies. Three cohort studies and four case-control studies had dose-response data. Evidence from cohort studies showed that people who consumed the equivalent of 100 g/day of pure alcohol had an 11.71 fold, (95% confidence interval, CI: 2.67-51.32) risk of oesophageal cancer compared to those who never consumed alcohol. Evidence from case-control studies showed that the increase in risk was 33.11 fold (95% CI: 8.15-134.43) in the population at large. The difference by study design is explained by the 159 fold (95% CI: 27.2-938.2) risk among those with an inactive aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme variant. Applying these dose-response estimates to the national profile of alcohol intake yielded 5279 oesophageal cancer deaths and 102 988 DALYs lost - almost double the estimates produced by the most recent global burden of disease exercise. Use of global dose-response data results in an underestimate of the burden of disease from oesophageal cancer in Japan. Where possible, national burden of disease studies should use results from the population concerned.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 20%
Student > Bachelor 7 14%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Other 11 22%
Unknown 9 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 6%
Psychology 3 6%
Engineering 3 6%
Other 10 20%
Unknown 12 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2015.
All research outputs
#5,610,213
of 17,367,552 outputs
Outputs from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#1,858
of 3,940 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,707
of 286,812 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#41
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,367,552 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,940 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,812 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.