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Using patient-held records to evaluate contraceptive use in Malawi

Overview of attention for article published in Bulletin of the World Health Organization, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
62 Mendeley
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Title
Using patient-held records to evaluate contraceptive use in Malawi
Published in
Bulletin of the World Health Organization, August 2015
DOI 10.2471/blt.14.145623
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aisha NZ Dasgupta, Ruth Ngwalo, Keith Branson, Levie Gondwe, Frank Taulo, Bagrey Ngwira, Basia Zaba, Amelia C Crampin

Abstract

To investigate a method of using patient-held records to collect contraception data in Malawi, that could be used to explore contraceptive discontinuation and method switching. In 2012, all 7393 women aged 15 to 49 years living in the area covered by the Karonga demographic surveillance site were offered a family planning card, which was attached to the woman's health passport - a patient-held medical record. Health-care providers were trained to use the cards to record details of contraception given to women. During the study, providers underwent refresher training sessions and received motivational text messages to improve data completeness. After one year, the family planning cards were collected for analysis. Of the 7393 eligible women, 6861 (92.8%) received a family planning card and 4678 (63.3%) returned it after one year. Details of 87.3% (2725/3122) of contacts between health-care providers and the women had been recorded by health-care providers on either family planning cards or health passports. Lower-level health-care providers were more diligent at recording data on the family planning cards than higher-level providers. The use of family planning cards was an effective way of recording details of contraception provided by family planning providers. The involvement of health-care providers was key to the success of this approach. Data collected in this way should prove helpful in producing accurate estimates of method switching and the continuity of contraceptive use by women.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 62 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 29%
Researcher 11 18%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Other 4 6%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 11 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 27%
Social Sciences 14 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 10%
Psychology 4 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 3%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 11 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2015.
All research outputs
#4,467,537
of 14,573,919 outputs
Outputs from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#1,362
of 2,711 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,008
of 276,151 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#41
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,573,919 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,711 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,151 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.