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Non-specific gastrointestinal features: Could it be Fabry disease?

Overview of attention for article published in Digestive and Liver Disease, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
28 Mendeley
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Title
Non-specific gastrointestinal features: Could it be Fabry disease?
Published in
Digestive and Liver Disease, March 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.dld.2018.02.011
Pubmed ID
Authors

Max J. Hilz, Eloisa Arbustini, Lorenzo Dagna, Antonio Gasbarrini, Cyril Goizet, Didier Lacombe, Rocco Liguori, Raffaele Manna, Juan Politei, Marco Spada, Alessandro Burlina

Abstract

Non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms, including pain, diarrhoea, nausea, and vomiting, can be the first symptoms of Fabry disease. They may suggest more common disorders, e.g. irritable bowel syndrome or inflammatory bowel disease. The confounding clinical presentation and rarity of Fabry disease often cause long diagnostic delays and multiple misdiagnoses. Therefore, specialists involved in the clinical evaluation of non-specific upper and lower gastrointestinal symptoms should recognize Fabry disease as a possible cause of the symptoms, and should consider Fabry disease as a possible differential diagnosis. When symptoms or family history suggest Fabry disease, in men, low alpha-galactosidase A enzyme levels, and in women, specific Fabry mutations confirm the diagnosis. In addition to symptomatic treatments, disease-specific enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human alpha-galactosidase A enzyme or chaperone therapy (migalastat) in patients with amenable mutations can improve the disease, including gastrointestinal symptoms, and should be initiated as early as possible after Fabry disease has been confirmed; starting enzyme replacement therapy at as young an age as possible after diagnosis improves long-term clinical outcomes. Improved diagnostic tools, such as a modified gastrointestinal symptom rating scale, may facilitate diagnosing Fabry disease in patients with gastrointestinal symptoms of unknown cause and thus assure timely initiation of disease-specific treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 6 21%
Student > Master 5 18%
Researcher 3 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 11%
Professor 2 7%
Other 9 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 9 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 32%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 14%
Psychology 3 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 7%
Other 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 April 2018.
All research outputs
#6,712,269
of 12,761,472 outputs
Outputs from Digestive and Liver Disease
#425
of 1,029 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#116,971
of 273,797 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Digestive and Liver Disease
#7
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,761,472 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,029 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,797 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.