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Perceptions of self-rated health among stroke survivors: a qualitative study in the United Kingdom

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Geriatrics, April 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
22 Mendeley
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Title
Perceptions of self-rated health among stroke survivors: a qualitative study in the United Kingdom
Published in
BMC Geriatrics, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12877-018-0765-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

N. Mavaddat, E. Sadler, L. Lim, K. Williams, E. Warburton, A. L. Kinmonth, J. Mant, J. Burt, C. McKevitt

Abstract

Self-rated health predicts health outcomes independently of levels of disability or mood. Little is known about what influences the subjective health experience of stroke survivors. Our aim was to investigate stroke survivors' perceptions of self-rated health, with the intention of informing the design of interventions that may improve their subjective health experience. We conducted semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of 28 stroke survivors recruited from a stroke unit and follow-up outpatient clinic, 4-6 months after stroke, to explore what factors are perceived to be part of self-rated health in the early stages of recovery. Qualitative data were analysed using a thematic analysis approach to identify underlying themes. Participants' accounts show that stroke survivors' perceptions of self-rated health are multifactorial, comprising physical, psychological and social components. Views on future recovery after stroke play a role in present health experience and are shaped by psychosocial resources that are influenced by past experiences of ill-health, dispositional outlook such as degree of optimism, a sense of control and views on ageing. Severity of physical limitations alone does not influence perceptions of self-rated health among stroke survivors. Self-rated health in stroke survivors is a multidimensional construct shaped by changes in health status occurring after the stroke, individual characteristics and social context. Understanding the factors stroke survivors themselves associate with better health will inform the development of effective approaches to improve rehabilitation and recovery after stroke.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 4 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 18%
Student > Master 3 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 14%
Researcher 2 9%
Other 6 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 6 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 14%
Psychology 3 14%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 9%
Other 4 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 April 2018.
All research outputs
#2,920,010
of 12,749,777 outputs
Outputs from BMC Geriatrics
#535
of 1,298 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,172
of 273,126 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Geriatrics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,749,777 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,298 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,126 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them