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Gastric stimulation: influence of electrical parameters on gastric emptying in control and diabetic rats

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Surgery, July 2002
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 patents

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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8 Mendeley
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Title
Gastric stimulation: influence of electrical parameters on gastric emptying in control and diabetic rats
Published in
BMC Surgery, July 2002
DOI 10.1186/1471-2482-2-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Isabelle Le Blanc-Louvry, Florence Guerre, Badjona Songné, Philippe Ducrotté

Abstract

The aim of this study was to test the effect of different pulse frequencies and amplitudes during gastric stimulation (GS) on gastric emptying in the rat. GS was performed in 2 groups of laparotomized rats: healthy control animals, and rats with acute diabetes. The effects of four pulse frequencies (0.5, 1, 10, 20 Hz) and three pulse amplitudes (5, 20, 40 mA) were tested. The volumes emptied from the stomach after the oro-gastric instillation of a nutrient solution were compared to those obtained in animals without GS. Intragastric pH values were assessed under basal conditions and after GS. In both groups, GS increased emptied volumes compared to conditions without stimulation (p < 0.05) for pulse frequencies above 0.5 Hz. Increases in pulse frequencies accelerated gastric emptying (p < 0.01) with a plateau at around 10 Hz. The increase in pulse amplitudes resulted in larger emptied volumes only when the pulse frequency was 1 Hz (p < 0.04) while the opposite effect was observed at 20 Hz (p < 0.04). The most effective combinations to enhance gastric emptying compared to baseline conditions were 10 Hz with 5 or 20 mA. The overall effect of GS on gastric emptying compared to baseline conditions without stimulation, was greater in diabetic than in controls rats (p < 0.05). During stimulation, intragastric pH values were not different from basal conditions during fasting or after a meal in control and diabetic rats. Although both pulse frequency and amplitude should be considered during GS, frequency appears to be the most critical point. The possibility of increasing gastric emptying by electrical stimulation in diabetic rats suggests potential clinical applications for this method.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 13%
Professor 1 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 13%
Lecturer 1 13%
Other 2 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 13%
Chemistry 1 13%
Engineering 1 13%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 June 2015.
All research outputs
#2,491,613
of 9,352,843 outputs
Outputs from BMC Surgery
#66
of 355 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,365
of 98,822 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Surgery
#1
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,352,843 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 59th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 355 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 98,822 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them