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Landscape connectivity for bobcat (Lynx rufus) and lynx (Lynx canadensis) in the Northeastern United States

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, March 2018
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Title
Landscape connectivity for bobcat (Lynx rufus) and lynx (Lynx canadensis) in the Northeastern United States
Published in
PLOS ONE, March 2018
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0194243
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laura E. Farrell, Daniel M. Levy, Therese Donovan, Ruth Mickey, Alan Howard, Jennifer Vashon, Mark Freeman, Kim Royar, C. William Kilpatrick

Abstract

Landscape connectivity is integral to the persistence of metapopulations of wide ranging carnivores and other terrestrial species. The objectives of this research were to investigate the landscape characteristics essential to use of areas by lynx and bobcats in northern New England, map a habitat availability model for each species, and explore connectivity across areas of the region likely to experience future development pressure. A Mahalanobis distance analysis was conducted on location data collected between 2005 and 2010 from 16 bobcats in western Vermont and 31 lynx in northern Maine to determine which variables were most consistent across all locations for each species using three scales based on average 1) local (15 minute) movement, 2) linear distance between daily locations, and 3) female home range size. The bobcat model providing the widest separation between used locations and random study area locations suggests that they cue into landscape features such as edge, availability of cover, and development density at different scales. The lynx model with the widest separation between random and used locations contained five variables including natural habitat, cover, and elevation-all at different scales. Shrub scrub habitat-where lynx's preferred prey is most abundant-was represented at the daily distance moved scale. Cross validation indicated that outliers had little effect on models for either species. A habitat suitability value was calculated for each 30 m2 pixel across Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine for each species and used to map connectivity between conserved lands within selected areas across the region. Projections of future landscape change illustrated potential impacts of anthropogenic development on areas lynx and bobcat may use, and indicated where connectivity for bobcats and lynx may be lost. These projections provided a guide for conservation of landscape permeability for lynx, bobcat, and species relying on similar habitats in the region.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 20%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Researcher 6 12%
Professor 3 6%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 8 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 39%
Environmental Science 11 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Computer Science 1 2%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 14 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 April 2018.
All research outputs
#15,946,837
of 20,582,425 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#128,885
of 177,649 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#210,786
of 296,193 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#1,983
of 2,591 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,582,425 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 177,649 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.4. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 2,591 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.