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On the role of NR3A in human NMDA receptors

Overview of attention for article published in Physiology & Behavior, September 2007
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
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Title
On the role of NR3A in human NMDA receptors
Published in
Physiology & Behavior, September 2007
DOI 10.1016/j.physbeh.2007.05.026
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Eriksson, Anna Nilsson, Helena Samuelsson, Eva-Britt Samuelsson, Lili Mo, Elisabet Åkesson, Eirikur Benedikz, Erik Sundström

Abstract

In the present paper we describe our on-going project investigating the functional roles of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR3A. We find that NR3A mRNA is abundant both in embryonic and adult human brain, in contrast to the almost non-existing expression in adult rodent brain. Human NR3A (hNR3A) protein expression is particularly abundant in the cerebral cortex, as shown by western blot using NR3A-specific antibodies. Distribution of hNR3A in adult human brain shows a similar pattern as NR3A in post-natal rodent brain. We have previously reported that NR3A contains a glycine binding site, with similar affinity as the glycine binding site of NR1 subunits. This suggests that NR3A may replace one of the two NR1 subunits in native NMDA receptors. Cloning of hNR3A showed a human-specific polyproline-sequence in the intracellular C-terminus, that may bind to SH3-domains. We hypothesized that the significant differences in expression in the adult human and rodent brain could be due to an atypical interaction of hNR3A with the SH3 domain of the synaptic scaffolding protein PSD-95, that binds to NR2 subunits through its PDZ domains. However, using a number of different protein interaction assays, binding of PSD-95 to hNR3A could no be demonstrated either in vitro or in vivo. To identify intracellular signaling pathways for NR3A-containing NMDA receptors, we screened for proteins interacting with hNR3A and identified three proteins: plectin, CARP-1 and GPS2. The possible physiological roles of these interactions are discussed.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
France 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 44 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 31%
Researcher 14 29%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 8%
Student > Master 3 6%
Professor 2 4%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 5 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 42%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 15%
Neuroscience 6 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Psychology 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 December 2007.
All research outputs
#3,520,420
of 12,276,818 outputs
Outputs from Physiology & Behavior
#1,166
of 3,512 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,777
of 271,130 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Physiology & Behavior
#33
of 93 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,276,818 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,512 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,130 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 93 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.