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Unexpected conservation of the RNA splicing apparatus in the highly streamlined genome of Galdieria sulphuraria

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, April 2018
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Title
Unexpected conservation of the RNA splicing apparatus in the highly streamlined genome of Galdieria sulphuraria
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12862-018-1161-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Huan Qiu, Alessandro W. Rossoni, Andreas P. M. Weber, Hwan Su Yoon, Debashish Bhattacharya

Abstract

Genome reduction in intracellular pathogens and endosymbionts is usually compensated by reliance on the host for energy and nutrients. Free-living taxa with reduced genomes must however evolve strategies for generating functional diversity to support their independent lifestyles. An emerging model for the latter case is the Rhodophyta (red algae) that comprises an ecologically widely distributed, species-rich phylum. Red algae have undergone multiple phases of significant genome reduction, including extremophilic unicellular taxa with limited nuclear gene inventories that must cope with hot, highly acidic environments. Using genomic data from eight red algal lineages, we identified 155 spliceosomal machinery (SM)-associated genes that were putatively present in the red algal common ancestor. This core SM gene set is most highly conserved in Galdieria species (150 SM genes) and underwent differing levels of gene loss in other examined red algae (53-145 SM genes). Surprisingly, the high SM conservation in Galdieria sulphuraria coincides with the enrichment of spliceosomal introns in this species (2 introns/gene) in comparison to other red algae (< 0.34 introns/gene). Spliceosomal introns in G. sulphuraria undergo alternatively splicing, including many that are differentially spliced upon changes in culture temperature. Our work reveals the unique nature of G. sulphuraria among red algae with respect to the conservation of the spliceosomal machinery and introns. We discuss the possible implications of these findings in the highly streamlined genome of this free-living eukaryote.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 31%
Researcher 3 23%
Student > Bachelor 2 15%
Student > Master 1 8%
Unknown 3 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 46%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 31%
Unknown 3 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 April 2018.
All research outputs
#11,339,378
of 12,749,777 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#2,266
of 2,407 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#237,892
of 273,548 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
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