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Human γδ T Cell Receptor Repertoires in Peripheral Blood Remain Stable Despite Clearance of Persistent Hepatitis C Virus Infection by Direct-Acting Antiviral Drug Therapy

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in immunology, March 2018
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32 Mendeley
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Title
Human γδ T Cell Receptor Repertoires in Peripheral Blood Remain Stable Despite Clearance of Persistent Hepatitis C Virus Infection by Direct-Acting Antiviral Drug Therapy
Published in
Frontiers in immunology, March 2018
DOI 10.3389/fimmu.2018.00510
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarina Ravens, Julia Hengst, Verena Schlapphoff, Katja Deterding, Akshay Dhingra, Christian Schultze-Florey, Christian Koenecke, Markus Cornberg, Heiner Wedemeyer, Immo Prinz

Abstract

Human γδ T cells can contribute to clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection but also mediate liver inflammation. This study aimed to understand the clonal distribution of γδ T cells in peripheral blood of chronic HCV patients and following HCV clearance by interferon-free direct-acting antiviral drug therapies. To this end, γδ T cell receptor (TCR) repertoires were monitored by mRNA-based next-generation sequencing. While the percentage of Vγ9+T cells was higher in patients with elevated liver enzymes and a few expanded Vδ3 clones could be identified in peripheral blood of 23 HCV-infected non-cirrhotic patients, overall clonality and complexity of γδ TCR repertoires were largely comparable to those of matched healthy donors. Monitoring eight chronic HCV patients before, during and up to 1 year after therapy revealed that direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drug therapies induced only minor alterations of TRG and TRD repertoires of Vγ9+and Vγ9-cells. Together, we show that peripheral γδ TCR repertoires display a high stability (1) by chronic HCV infection in the absence of liver cirrhosis and (2) by HCV clearance in the course of DAA drug therapy.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 28%
Researcher 5 16%
Unspecified 3 9%
Student > Master 3 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 10 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 10 31%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 13%
Unspecified 3 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 11 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 November 2018.
All research outputs
#8,871,504
of 14,158,567 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in immunology
#5,995
of 9,534 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#165,552
of 276,361 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in immunology
#255
of 335 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,158,567 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,534 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,361 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 335 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.