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A 17-year trend analysis of malaria at Adi Arkay, north Gondar zone, Northwest Ethiopia

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, April 2018
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4 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

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12 Mendeley
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Title
A 17-year trend analysis of malaria at Adi Arkay, north Gondar zone, Northwest Ethiopia
Published in
Malaria Journal, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2310-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Habtie Tesfa, Abebe Genetu Bayih, Ayalew Jejaw Zeleke

Abstract

Malaria is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. This study aimed to determine the trend of malaria among febrile patients seeking treatment over 17 year (1997-2013) at Adi Arkay, Northwest Ethiopia. A 17-year malaria microscopy data were extracted retrospectively at Adi Arkay health centre. Time series and curve estimation analysis were used to evaluate trends in the data. Pearson's Chi square test was also used to describe associations of variables. Over 17 years, 20,483 blood films were requested for malaria diagnosis at the health centre. Out of this, 7428 (36.1%) were microscopically confirmed malaria cases. Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax, and their mixed infection accounted for 68.85, 28.79, and 2.34% of all malaria cases, respectively. There was a remarkable reduction of overall malaria during the 17 years. Malaria was reported in all age groups of both sexes, but its positivity rate was significantly higher in males and in the 15-24 years than their counterparts. In relative terms, the overall positivity rate of malaria in the area over 17 years showed a significant reduction, but its magnitude as a public health problem is still alarming. Plasmodium falciparum played a significant role in the remarkable drop of overall malaria in the area, whereas vivax malaria remained unchanged. Therefore, control measures should continue to strengthen targeting both predominant malaria parasites in the area.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 2 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 17%
Researcher 2 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 17%
Lecturer 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 25%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 17%
Physics and Astronomy 1 8%
Social Sciences 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 2 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2018.
All research outputs
#7,758,386
of 13,793,900 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,528
of 3,992 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#134,820
of 274,059 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,793,900 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,992 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,059 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them