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Flinders Island Spotted Fever Rickettsioses Caused by “marmionii” Strain ofRickettsia honei,Eastern Australia

Overview of attention for article published in Emerging Infectious Diseases, April 2007
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Title
Flinders Island Spotted Fever Rickettsioses Caused by “marmionii” Strain ofRickettsia honei,Eastern Australia
Published in
Emerging Infectious Diseases, April 2007
DOI 10.3201/eid1304.050087
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nathan B. Unsworth, John Stenos, Stephen R. Graves, Antony G. Faa, G. Erika Cox, John R. Dyer, Craig S. Boutlis, Amanda M. Lane, Matthew D. Shaw, Jennifer Robson, Michael D. Nissen

Abstract

Australia has 4 rickettsial diseases: murine typhus, Queensland tick typhus, Flinders Island spotted fever, and scrub typhus. We describe 7 cases of a rickettsiosis with an acute onset and symptoms of fever (100%), headache (71%), arthralgia (43%), myalgia (43%), cough (43%), maculopapular/petechial rash (43%), nausea (29%), pharyngitis (29%), lymphadenopathy (29%), and eschar (29%). Cases were most prevalent in autumn and from eastern Australia, including Queensland, Tasmania, and South Australia. One patient had a history of tick bite (Haemaphysalis novaeguineae). An isolate shared 99.2%, 99.8%, 99.8%, 99.9%, and 100% homology with the 17 kDa, ompA, gltA, 16S rRNA, and Sca4 genes, respectively, of Rickettsia honei. This Australian rickettsiosis has similar symptoms to Flinders Island spotted fever, and the strain is genetically related to R. honei. It has been designated the "marmionii" strain of R. honei, in honor of Australian physician and scientist Barrie Marmion.

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2018.
All research outputs
#3,673,942
of 12,612,351 outputs
Outputs from Emerging Infectious Diseases
#3,231
of 6,404 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,185
of 278,422 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Emerging Infectious Diseases
#66
of 108 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,612,351 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,404 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.3. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,422 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 108 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.