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A Recurrent De Novo PACS2 Heterozygous Missense Variant Causes Neonatal-Onset Developmental Epileptic Encephalopathy, Facial Dysmorphism, and Cerebellar Dysgenesis

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Human Genetics, May 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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12 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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28 Mendeley
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Title
A Recurrent De Novo PACS2 Heterozygous Missense Variant Causes Neonatal-Onset Developmental Epileptic Encephalopathy, Facial Dysmorphism, and Cerebellar Dysgenesis
Published in
American Journal of Human Genetics, May 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.ajhg.2018.03.005
Pubmed ID
Authors

Heather E. Olson, Nolwenn Jean-Marçais, Edward Yang, Delphine Heron, Katrina Tatton-Brown, Paul A. van der Zwaag, Emilia K. Bijlsma, Bryan L. Krock, E. Backer, Erik-Jan Kamsteeg, Margje Sinnema, Margot R.F. Reijnders, David Bearden, Amber Begtrup, Aida Telegrafi, Roelineke J. Lunsing, Lydie Burglen, Gaetan Lesca, Megan T. Cho, Lacey A. Smith, Beth R. Sheidley, Christelle Moufawad El Achkar, Phillip L. Pearl, Annapurna Poduri, Cara M. Skraban, Jennifer Tarpinian, Addie I. Nesbitt, Dietje E. Fransen van de Putte, Claudia A.L. Ruivenkamp, Patrick Rump, Nicolas Chatron, Isabelle Sabatier, Julitta De Bellescize, Laurent Guibaud, David A. Sweetser, Jessica L. Waxler, Klaas J. Wierenga, Jean Donadieu, Vinodh Narayanan, Keri M. Ramsey, Caroline Nava, Jean-Baptiste Rivière, Antonio Vitobello, Frédéric Tran Mau-Them, Christophe Philippe, Ange-Line Bruel, Yannis Duffourd, Laurel Thomas, Stefan H. Lelieveld, Janneke Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Han G. Brunner, Boris Keren, Julien Thevenon, Laurence Faivre, Gary Thomas, Christel Thauvin-Robinet

Abstract

Developmental and epileptic encephalopathies (DEEs) represent a large clinical and genetic heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental diseases. The identification of pathogenic genetic variants in DEEs remains crucial for deciphering this complex group and for accurately caring for affected individuals (clinical diagnosis, genetic counseling, impacting medical, precision therapy, clinical trials, etc.). Whole-exome sequencing and intensive data sharing identified a recurrent de novo PACS2 heterozygous missense variant in 14 unrelated individuals. Their phenotype was characterized by epilepsy, global developmental delay with or without autism, common cerebellar dysgenesis, and facial dysmorphism. Mixed focal and generalized epilepsy occurred in the neonatal period, controlled with difficulty in the first year, but many improved in early childhood. PACS2 is an important PACS1 paralog and encodes a multifunctional sorting protein involved in nuclear gene expression and pathway traffic regulation. Both proteins harbor cargo(furin)-binding regions (FBRs) that bind cargo proteins, sorting adaptors, and cellular kinase. Compared to the defined PACS1 recurrent variant series, individuals with PACS2 variant have more consistently neonatal/early-infantile-onset epilepsy that can be challenging to control. Cerebellar abnormalities may be similar but PACS2 individuals exhibit a pattern of clear dysgenesis ranging from mild to severe. Functional studies demonstrated that the PACS2 recurrent variant reduces the ability of the predicted autoregulatory domain to modulate the interaction between the PACS2 FBR and client proteins, which may disturb cellular function. These findings support the causality of this recurrent de novo PACS2 heterozygous missense in DEEs with facial dysmorphim and cerebellar dysgenesis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 25%
Student > Bachelor 6 21%
Researcher 5 18%
Other 2 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 3 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Computer Science 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 5 18%
Unknown 5 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 June 2018.
All research outputs
#3,042,364
of 13,780,426 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Human Genetics
#1,897
of 4,644 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,526
of 272,735 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Human Genetics
#36
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,780,426 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,644 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,735 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.