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Skepticism towards the Swedish vision zero for suicide: interviews with 12 psychiatrists

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Ethics, April 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)

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3 tweeters

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Title
Skepticism towards the Swedish vision zero for suicide: interviews with 12 psychiatrists
Published in
BMC Medical Ethics, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12910-018-0265-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Petter Karlsson, Gert Helgesson, David Titelman, Manne Sjöstrand, Niklas Juth

Abstract

The main causes of suicide and how suicide could and should be prevented are ongoing controversies in the scientific literature as well as in public media. In the bill on public health from 2008 (Prop 2007/08:110), the Swedish Parliament adopted an overarching "Vision Zero for Suicide" (VZ) and nine strategies for suicide prevention. However, how the VZ should be interpreted in healthcare is unclear. The VZ has been criticized both from a philosophical perspective and against the background of clinical experience and alleged empirical claims regarding the consequences of regulating suicide prevention. This study is part of a larger research project in medical ethics with the overarching aim to explore whether the VZ is ethically justifiable. The aim is to enrich the normative discussion by investigating empirically how the VZ is perceived in healthcare. Interviews based on a semi-structured interview guide were performed with 12 Swedish psychiatrists. The interviews were analysed with descriptive qualitative content analysis aiming for identifying perceptions of the Vision Zero for Suicide as well as arguments for and against it. Though most of the participants mentioned at least some potential benefit of the Vision Zero for Suicide, the overall impression was a predominant skepticism. Some participants focused on why they consider the VZ to be unachievable, while others focused more on its potential consequences and normative implications. The VZ was perceived to be impossible to realize, nonconstructive or potentially counterproductive, and undesirable because of potential conflicts with other values and interests of patients as well as the general public. There were also important notions of the VZ having negative consequences for the working conditions of psychiatrists in Sweden, in increasing their work-related anxiety and thwarting the patient-physician relationship.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 22%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 17%
Student > Postgraduate 3 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 26%
Psychology 6 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 9%
Computer Science 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 April 2018.
All research outputs
#6,930,827
of 12,801,247 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Ethics
#377
of 543 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#123,686
of 271,793 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Ethics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,801,247 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 543 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.3. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,793 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them