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Dietary emulsifiers impact the mouse gut microbiota promoting colitis and metabolic syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, February 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Citations

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682 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1182 Mendeley
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9 CiteULike
Title
Dietary emulsifiers impact the mouse gut microbiota promoting colitis and metabolic syndrome
Published in
Nature, February 2015
DOI 10.1038/nature14232
Pubmed ID
Authors

Benoit Chassaing, Omry Koren, Julia K. Goodrich, Angela C. Poole, Shanthi Srinivasan, Ruth E. Ley, Andrew T. Gewirtz

Abstract

The intestinal tract is inhabited by a large and diverse community of microbes collectively referred to as the gut microbiota. While the gut microbiota provides important benefits to its host, especially in metabolism and immune development, disturbance of the microbiota-host relationship is associated with numerous chronic inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and the group of obesity-associated diseases collectively referred to as metabolic syndrome. A primary means by which the intestine is protected from its microbiota is via multi-layered mucus structures that cover the intestinal surface, thereby allowing the vast majority of gut bacteria to be kept at a safe distance from epithelial cells that line the intestine. Thus, agents that disrupt mucus-bacterial interactions might have the potential to promote diseases associated with gut inflammation. Consequently, it has been hypothesized that emulsifiers, detergent-like molecules that are a ubiquitous component of processed foods and that can increase bacterial translocation across epithelia in vitro, might be promoting the increase in inflammatory bowel disease observed since the mid-twentieth century. Here we report that, in mice, relatively low concentrations of two commonly used emulsifiers, namely carboxymethylcellulose and polysorbate-80, induced low-grade inflammation and obesity/metabolic syndrome in wild-type hosts and promoted robust colitis in mice predisposed to this disorder. Emulsifier-induced metabolic syndrome was associated with microbiota encroachment, altered species composition and increased pro-inflammatory potential. Use of germ-free mice and faecal transplants indicated that such changes in microbiota were necessary and sufficient for both low-grade inflammation and metabolic syndrome. These results support the emerging concept that perturbed host-microbiota interactions resulting in low-grade inflammation can promote adiposity and its associated metabolic effects. Moreover, they suggest that the broad use of emulsifying agents might be contributing to an increased societal incidence of obesity/metabolic syndrome and other chronic inflammatory diseases.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,182 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 16 1%
Germany 7 <1%
Canada 4 <1%
France 3 <1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Spain 3 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
Other 15 1%
Unknown 1125 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 260 22%
Researcher 246 21%
Student > Master 143 12%
Student > Bachelor 122 10%
Other 69 6%
Other 229 19%
Unknown 113 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 375 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 216 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 151 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 79 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 42 4%
Other 153 13%
Unknown 166 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1486. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 July 2020.
All research outputs
#2,723
of 15,549,387 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#400
of 74,987 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39
of 217,821 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#10
of 986 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,549,387 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 74,987 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 84.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 217,821 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 986 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.