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Perceptions and beliefs of public policymakers in a Southern European city

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal for Equity in Health, February 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
64 Mendeley
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Title
Perceptions and beliefs of public policymakers in a Southern European city
Published in
International Journal for Equity in Health, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12939-015-0143-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joana Morrison, Mariona Pons-Vigués, Elia Díez, Maria Isabel Pasarin, Sergio Salas-Nicás, Carme Borrell

Abstract

Socio-economic inequalities in health are large in urban areas; however, local municipal governments may plan, manage and provide services and policies which can reduce these. The objective of this study was to describe the beliefs and perceptions of public policymakers in a European city, Barcelona. They are the key actors in designing and implementing urban public policies. A qualitative research study describing policymakers' beliefs on health inequalities. The study population were twelve policymakers. These were politicians or officers from the city council. Informant profiles were selected using a theoretical sample. Semi-structured individual interviews were performed to collect the data and a thematic content analysis was carried out. Politicians were aware of health inequalities in their city and identified diverse social causes. They viewed reducing inequalities as a priority for the city's government. Officers were less knowledgeable and described less efforts in addressing health inequalities. It was stated by some that reducing inequalities in non-health sectors helped to reduce health inequalities indirectly and there was some collaboration between two sectors. The most frequent barriers encountered when implementing policies were funding and the cities' limited authority. Officers and policymakers had different levels of awareness and access to information on health and its socials determinants. Officers referred to specific causes of health inequalities and policies which related to their sectors and politicians were more familiar with upstream determinants and policies. Some participants explained that policies and programmes needed to be evaluated and very little intersectoral action was said to be carried out. More efforts should be made to provide all policymakers with information on the social determinants of health inequalities. Research on health inequalities and policy should engage with policymakers and promote health as a cross cutting issue in the city council in liaison with the third sector.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 63 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 27%
Researcher 16 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Other 5 8%
Librarian 4 6%
Other 12 19%
Unknown 5 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 28%
Social Sciences 16 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 13%
Design 2 3%
Computer Science 2 3%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 12 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 February 2016.
All research outputs
#2,572,168
of 11,340,149 outputs
Outputs from International Journal for Equity in Health
#333
of 852 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,735
of 208,577 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal for Equity in Health
#7
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,340,149 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 852 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 208,577 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.