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Changes in mumps virus neurovirulence phenotype associated with quasispecies heterogeneity

Overview of attention for article published in Virology, June 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
47 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Changes in mumps virus neurovirulence phenotype associated with quasispecies heterogeneity
Published in
Virology, June 2006
DOI 10.1016/j.virol.2006.01.035
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christian J. Sauder, Kari M. Vandenburgh, Rebecca C. Iskow, Tahir Malik, Kathryn M. Carbone, Steven A. Rubin

Abstract

Mumps virus is a highly neurotropic virus with evidence of central nervous system invasion (CNS) in approximately half of all cases of infection. In countries where live attenuated mumps virus vaccines were introduced, the number of mumps cases declined dramatically; however, recently, the safety of some vaccine strains has been questioned. For example, one of the most widely used vaccines, the Urabe AM9 strain, was causally associated with meningitis, leading to the withdrawal of this product from the market in several countries. This highlights the need for a better understanding of the attenuation process and the identification of markers of attenuation. To this end, we further attenuated the Urabe AM9 strain by serial passage in cell culture and compared the complete nucleotide sequences of the parental and passaged viruses. Interestingly, despite a dramatic decrease in virus virulence (as assayed in rats), the only genomic changes were in the form of changes in the level of genetic heterogeneity at specific genome sites, i.e., either selection of one nucleotide variant at positions where the starting material exhibited nucleotide heterogeneity or the evolution of an additional nucleotide to create a heterogenic site. This finding suggests that changes in the level of genetic heterogeneity at specific genome sites can have profound neurovirulence phenotypic consequences and, therefore, caution should be exercised when evaluating genetic markers of virulence or attenuation based only on a consensus sequence.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 36 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 30%
Professor 6 16%
Researcher 6 16%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Other 2 5%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 3 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 51%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 11%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 September 2011.
All research outputs
#4,261,928
of 17,360,236 outputs
Outputs from Virology
#2,625
of 8,473 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,075
of 108,710 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virology
#7
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,360,236 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,473 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 108,710 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.