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Atmospheric particulate matter in proximity to mountaintop coal mines: sources and potential environmental and human health impacts

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Geochemistry & Health, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#14 of 314)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
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Title
Atmospheric particulate matter in proximity to mountaintop coal mines: sources and potential environmental and human health impacts
Published in
Environmental Geochemistry & Health, December 2014
DOI 10.1007/s10653-014-9669-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laura Kurth, Allan Kolker, Mark Engle, Nicholas Geboy, Michael Hendryx, William Orem, Michael McCawley, Lynn Crosby, Calin Tatu, Matthew Varonka, Christina DeVera

Abstract

Mountaintop removal mining (MTM) is a widely used approach to surface coal mining in the US Appalachian region whereby large volumes of coal overburden are excavated using explosives, removed, and transferred to nearby drainages below MTM operations. To investigate the air quality impact of MTM, the geochemical characteristics of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) from five surface mining sites in south central West Virginia, USA, and five in-state study control sites having only underground coal mining or no coal mining whatsoever were determined and compared. Epidemiologic studies show increased rates of cancer, respiratory disease, cardiovascular disease, and overall mortality in Appalachian surface mining areas compared to Appalachian non-mining areas. In the present study, 24-h coarse (>2.5 µm) and fine (≤2.5 µm) PM samples were collected from two surface mining sites in June 2011 showed pronounced enrichment in elements having a crustal affinity (Ga, Al, Ge, Rb, La, Ce) contributed by local sources, relative to controls. Follow-up sampling in August 2011 lacked this enrichment, suggesting that PM input from local sources is intermittent. Using passive samplers, dry deposition total PM elemental fluxes calculated for three surface mining sites over multi-day intervals between May and August 2012 were 5.8 ± 1.5 times higher for crustal elements than at controls. Scanning microscopy of 2,249 particles showed that primary aluminosilicate PM was prevalent at surface mining sites compared to secondary PM at controls. Additional testing is needed to establish any link between input of lithogenic PM and disease rates in the study area.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
China 1 2%
Colombia 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 52 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 22%
Researcher 12 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 20%
Unspecified 9 16%
Student > Postgraduate 2 4%
Other 9 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 12 22%
Unspecified 12 22%
Social Sciences 8 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 7%
Engineering 4 7%
Other 15 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 March 2015.
All research outputs
#1,021,951
of 12,340,143 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Geochemistry & Health
#14
of 314 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,916
of 225,008 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Geochemistry & Health
#1
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,340,143 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 314 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 225,008 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.