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Determination of a suitable low-dose abdominopelvic CT protocol using model-based iterative reconstruction through cadaveric study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Medical Imaging & Radiation Oncology, April 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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13 Mendeley
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Title
Determination of a suitable low-dose abdominopelvic CT protocol using model-based iterative reconstruction through cadaveric study
Published in
Journal of Medical Imaging & Radiation Oncology, April 2018
DOI 10.1111/1754-9485.12733
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fiachra Moloney, Maria Twomey, Daniel Fama, Joy Y Balta, Karl James, Richard G Kavanagh, Niamh Moore, Mary Jane Murphy, Siobhan M O'Mahony, Michael M Maher, John F Cryan, Owen J O'Connor

Abstract

Cadaveric studies provide a means of safely assessing new technologies and optimizing scanning prior to clinical validation. Reducing radiation exposure in a clinical setting can entail incremental dose reductions to avoid missing important clinical findings. The use of cadavers allows assessment of the impact of more substantial dose reductions on image quality. Our aim was to identify a suitable low-dose abdominopelvic CT protocol for subsequent clinical validation. Five human cadavers were scanned at one conventional dose and three low-dose settings. All scans were reconstructed using three different reconstruction algorithms: filtered back projection (FBP), hybrid iterative reconstruction (60% FBP and 40% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR40)), and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). Two readers rated the image quality both quantitatively and qualitatively. Model-based iterative reconstruction images had significantly better objective image noise and higher qualitative scores compared with both FBP and ASIR40 images at all dose levels. The greatest absolute noise reduction, between MBIR and FBP, of 34.3 HU (equating to a 68% reduction) was at the lowest dose level. MBIR reduced image noise and improved image quality even in CT images acquired with a mean radiation dose reduction of 62% compared with conventional dose studies reconstructed with ASIR40, with lower levels of objective image noise, superior diagnostic acceptability and contrast resolution, and comparable subjective image noise and streak artefact scores. This cadaveric study demonstrates that MBIR reduces image noise and improves image quality in abdominopelvic CT images acquired with dose reductions of up to 62%.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 3 23%
Student > Bachelor 3 23%
Student > Master 2 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Researcher 1 8%
Other 2 15%
Unknown 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 46%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 8%
Computer Science 1 8%
Unknown 5 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2018.
All research outputs
#6,943,599
of 12,826,501 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Medical Imaging & Radiation Oncology
#132
of 368 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,203
of 224,488 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Medical Imaging & Radiation Oncology
#4
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,826,501 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 368 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,488 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.