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Differences in cortisol concentrations in adolescents with eating disorders: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Jornal de Pediatria, January 2019
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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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8 Dimensions

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82 Mendeley
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Title
Differences in cortisol concentrations in adolescents with eating disorders: a systematic review
Published in
Jornal de Pediatria, January 2019
DOI 10.1016/j.jped.2018.02.007
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laércio Marques da Luz Neto, Flávia Maria Nassar de Vasconcelos, Jacqueline Elineuza da Silva, Tiago Coimbra Costa Pinto, Éverton Botelho Sougey, Rosana Christine Cavalcanti Ximenes

Abstract

To perform a systematic review of the literature for scientific evidence of possible differences in cortisol concentrations in adolescents with eating disorders. Electronic searches were conducting in the PubMed, Scientific Electronic Library Online, Virtual Health Library, and Science Direct databases for articles published between 2007 and 2017 using the keywords, cortisol, hydrocortisone; eating disorders, bulimia, bulimia nervosa, anorexia, anorexia nervosa; adolescence, adolescent, adolescents. A total of 192 articles were found. After the analysis of the eligibility criteria using the PRISMA method, 19 articles were selected for the present review. Most studies were conducted in Europe. Adolescents diagnosed with anorexia nervosa were evaluated in all studies, except one, when other eating disorders were investigated. Blood was the means used for the determination of cortisol. In ten studies, cortisol levels were higher in the group with anorexia than the control group and a reduction in cortisol levels occurred in the adolescents after being submitted to nutritional recovery. Patients with eating disorders may have several clinical consequences, such as changes in body fat distribution, changes in bone mineral density, worsening of neurocognitive ability, and endocrine changes (e.g., hypercortisolemia), which in turn can lead to hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, hypertension, and increased risk of infections. The findings demonstrate that adolescents with eating disorders, especially anorexia nervosa, have increased cortisol levels, which are reduced after the treatment period. Further studies on differences in cortisol concentrations in adolescents with other eating disorders are needed, using different methods.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 82 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 82 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 13 16%
Researcher 11 13%
Student > Master 9 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 9%
Other 6 7%
Other 14 17%
Unknown 22 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 13%
Psychology 6 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Neuroscience 4 5%
Other 14 17%
Unknown 24 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 August 2019.
All research outputs
#11,273,390
of 19,152,115 outputs
Outputs from Jornal de Pediatria
#291
of 719 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,884
of 237,689 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Jornal de Pediatria
#5
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,152,115 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 719 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,689 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.