↓ Skip to main content

Cortical drive and thalamic feed-forward inhibition control thalamic output synchrony during absence seizures

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Neuroscience, April 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
32 X users
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
97 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
157 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Cortical drive and thalamic feed-forward inhibition control thalamic output synchrony during absence seizures
Published in
Nature Neuroscience, April 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41593-018-0130-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cian McCafferty, François David, Marcello Venzi, Magor L. Lőrincz, Francis Delicata, Zoe Atherton, Gregorio Recchia, Gergely Orban, Régis C. Lambert, Giuseppe Di Giovanni, Nathalie Leresche, Vincenzo Crunelli

Abstract

Behaviorally and pathologically relevant cortico-thalamo-cortical oscillations are driven by diverse interacting cell-intrinsic and synaptic processes. However, the mechanism that gives rise to the paroxysmal oscillations of absence seizures (ASs) remains unknown. Here we report that, during ASs in behaving animals, cortico-thalamic excitation drives thalamic firing by preferentially eliciting tonic rather than T-type Ca 2+ channel (T-channel)-dependent burst firing in thalamocortical (TC) neurons and by temporally framing thalamic output via feedforward reticular thalamic (NRT)-to-TC neuron inhibition. In TC neurons, overall ictal firing was markedly reduced and bursts rarely occurred. Moreover, blockade of T-channels in cortical and NRT neurons suppressed ASs, but such blockade in TC neurons had no effect on seizures or on ictal thalamic output synchrony. These results demonstrate ictal bidirectional cortico-thalamic communications and provide the first mechanistic understanding of cortico-thalamo-cortical network firing dynamics during ASs in behaving animals.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 32 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 157 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 157 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 39 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 22%
Student > Master 13 8%
Student > Bachelor 10 6%
Student > Postgraduate 7 4%
Other 23 15%
Unknown 31 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 69 44%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 2%
Unspecified 3 2%
Other 10 6%
Unknown 38 24%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 47. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 June 2018.
All research outputs
#831,730
of 24,250,928 outputs
Outputs from Nature Neuroscience
#1,430
of 5,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,880
of 300,145 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Neuroscience
#34
of 67 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,250,928 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,421 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 55.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,145 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 67 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.