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Estimating the potential survival gains by eliminating socioeconomic and sex inequalities in stage at diagnosis of melanoma

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Cancer, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
25 Mendeley
Title
Estimating the potential survival gains by eliminating socioeconomic and sex inequalities in stage at diagnosis of melanoma
Published in
British Journal of Cancer, March 2015
DOI 10.1038/bjc.2015.50
Pubmed ID
Authors

M J Rutherford, L Ironmonger, N Ormiston-Smith, G A Abel, D C Greenberg, G Lyratzopoulos, P C Lambert

Abstract

Background:Although inequalities in cancer survival are thought to reflect inequalities in stage at diagnosis, little evidence exists about the size of potential survival gains from eliminating inequalities in stage at diagnosis.Methods:We used data on patients diagnosed with malignant melanoma in the East of England (2006-2010) to estimate the number of deaths that could be postponed by completely eliminating socioeconomic and sex differences in stage at diagnosis after fitting a flexible parametric excess mortality model.Results:Stage was a strong predictor of survival. There were pronounced socioeconomic and sex inequalities in the proportion of patients diagnosed at stages III-IV (12 and 8% for least deprived men and women and 25 and 18% for most deprived men and women, respectively). For an annual cohort of 1025 incident cases in the East of England, eliminating sex and deprivation differences in stage at diagnosis would postpone approximately 24 deaths to beyond 5 years from diagnosis. Using appropriate weighting, the equivalent estimate for England would be around 215 deaths, representing 11% of all deaths observed within 5 years from diagnosis in this population.Conclusions:Reducing socioeconomic and sex inequalities in stage at diagnosis would result in substantial reductions in deaths within 5 years of a melanoma diagnosis.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 3 March 2015; doi:10.1038/bjc.2015.50 www.bjcancer.com.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 4%
Unknown 24 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 6 24%
Researcher 4 16%
Unspecified 4 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Other 6 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 44%
Unspecified 6 24%
Social Sciences 2 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 4 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 29. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 September 2019.
All research outputs
#576,613
of 13,589,056 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Cancer
#276
of 8,164 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,390
of 215,831 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Cancer
#19
of 168 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,589,056 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,164 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 215,831 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 168 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.