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Reaching older people with PA delivered in football clubs: the reach, adoption and implementation characteristics of the Extra Time Programme

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, March 2015
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

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45 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

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74 Mendeley
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Title
Reaching older people with PA delivered in football clubs: the reach, adoption and implementation characteristics of the Extra Time Programme
Published in
BMC Public Health, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1560-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel Parnell, Andy Pringle, Jim McKenna, Stephen Zwolinsky, Zoe Rutherford, Jackie Hargreaves, Lizzie Trotter, Michael Rigby, David Richardson

Abstract

Older adults (OA) represent a core priority group for physical activity and Public Health policy. As a result, significant interest is placed on how to optimise adherence to interventions promoting these approaches. Extra Time (ET) is an example of a national programme of physical activity interventions delivered in professional football clubs for OA aged 55+ years. This paper aims to examine the outcomes from ET, and unpick the processes by which these outcomes were achieved. This paper represents a secondary analysis of data collected during the evaluation of ET. From the 985 OA reached by ET, n=486 adopted the programme and completed post-intervention surveys (typically 12 weeks). We also draw on interview data with 18 ET participants, and 7 staff who delivered the programme. Data were subject to thematic analysis to generate overarching and sub themes. Of the 486 participants, the majority 95%, (n= 462) were White British and 59.7% (n=290) were female. Most adopters (65.4%/n=318) had not participated in previous interventions in the host clubs. Social interaction was the most frequently reported benefit of participation (77.2%, n=375). While the reach of the club badge was important in letting people know about the programme, further work enhanced adoption and satisfaction. These factors included (i) listening to participants, (ii) delivering a flexible age-appropriate programme of diverse physical and social activities, (iii) offering activities which satisfy energy drives and needs for learning and (iv) extensive opportunities for social engagement. Findings emerging from this study indicate that physical activity and health interventions delivered through professional football clubs can be effective for engaging OA.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 45 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 72 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 11%
Researcher 7 9%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Other 16 22%
Unknown 18 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 13 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 14%
Social Sciences 10 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 9%
Psychology 7 9%
Other 7 9%
Unknown 20 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 32. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2019.
All research outputs
#605,246
of 14,568,551 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#631
of 10,030 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,928
of 217,238 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,568,551 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,030 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 217,238 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them