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Characterization and expression of the ABC family (G group) in ‘Dangshansuli’ pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd.) and its russet mutant

Overview of attention for article published in Genetics and Molecular Biology, March 2018
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3 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

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Title
Characterization and expression of the ABC family (G group) in ‘Dangshansuli’ pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd.) and its russet mutant
Published in
Genetics and Molecular Biology, March 2018
DOI 10.1590/1678-4685-gmb-2017-0109
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zhaoqi Hou, Bing Jia, Fei Li, Pu Liu, Li Liu, Zhenfeng Ye, Liwu Zhu, Qi Wang, Wei Heng

Abstract

The plant genes encoding ABCGs that have been identified to date play a role in suberin formation in response to abiotic and biotic stress. In the present study, 80 ABCG genes were identified in 'Dangshansuli' Chinese white pear and designated as PbABCGs. Based on the structural characteristics and phylogenetic analysis, the PbABCG family genes could be classified into seven main groups: classes A-G. Segmental and dispersed duplications were the primary forces underlying the PbABCG gene family expansion in 'Dangshansuli' pear. Most of the PbABCG duplicated gene pairs date to the recent whole-genome duplication that occurred 30~45 million years ago. Purifying selection has also played a critical role in the evolution of the ABCG genes. Ten PbABCG genes screened in the transcriptome of 'Dangshansuli' pear and its russet mutant 'Xiusu' were validated, and the expression levels of the PbABCG genes exhibited significant differences at different stages. The results presented here will undoubtedly be useful for better understanding of the complexity of the PbABCG gene family and will facilitate the functional characterization of suberin formation in the russet mutant.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 33%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 33%
Professor 1 17%
Student > Master 1 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 83%
Unknown 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 April 2018.
All research outputs
#13,108,289
of 21,448,133 outputs
Outputs from Genetics and Molecular Biology
#265
of 265 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#159,173
of 298,064 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genetics and Molecular Biology
#3
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,448,133 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 265 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,064 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.