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The Association between Fatalistic Beliefs and Late Stage at Diagnosis of Lung and Colorectal Cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, February 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

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26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
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Title
The Association between Fatalistic Beliefs and Late Stage at Diagnosis of Lung and Colorectal Cancer
Published in
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, February 2015
DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.epi-14-0969
Pubmed ID
Authors

G. Lyratzopoulos, M. P.-H. Liu, G. A. Abel, J. Wardle, N. L. Keating

Abstract

Background: Fatalistic beliefs may be implicated in longer help-seeking intervals, and consequently, greater risk of advanced stage at cancer diagnosis. Methods: We examined associations between fatalism and stage at diagnosis in a population-based cohort of 4,319 U.S. patients with newly-diagnosed lung or colorectal cancer participating in the Cancer Care Outcomes and Research Surveillance (CanCORS) study. Fatalistic beliefs were assessed with an established measure. A fatalism score (range 4-16) was created by summing Likert-scale responses to four items. Cancer stage at diagnosis was abstracted from medical records by trained staff. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between fatalism score and advanced stage at diagnosis (IV vs I-III), adjusting for socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. Results: Overall, 917 (21%) patients had stage IV cancers (lung: 28%, colorectal: 16%). The mean fatalism score was 10.7 (median=11, inter-quartile range 9-12). In adjusted analyses, a higher fatalism score was associated with greater odds of stage IV diagnosis (odds ratio per unit increase in fatalism=1.05, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.08, p=0.003). Patients with the highest fatalism score had an adjusted 8.9% higher frequency of stage IV diagnosis compared with patients with the lowest score (25.4% vs. 16.5%). Conclusions: In this large and socioeconomically, geographically and ethnically diverse population of patients with lung and colorectal cancer, fatalistic beliefs were associated with higher risk of advanced stage at diagnosis. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm causation. Impact: These findings support the value of incorporating information about the curability of early-stage cancers in public education campaigns.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 23%
Student > Bachelor 8 17%
Student > Master 7 15%
Researcher 6 13%
Unspecified 6 13%
Other 10 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 11 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 23%
Psychology 7 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 8%
Computer Science 3 6%
Other 12 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 June 2018.
All research outputs
#3,217,514
of 13,093,005 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#1,027
of 3,150 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,163
of 255,233 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#24
of 86 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,093,005 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,150 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,233 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 86 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.