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Global warming transforms coral reef assemblages

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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882 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1430 Mendeley
Title
Global warming transforms coral reef assemblages
Published in
Nature, April 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41586-018-0041-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Terry P. Hughes, James T. Kerry, Andrew H. Baird, Sean R. Connolly, Andreas Dietzel, C. Mark Eakin, Scott F. Heron, Andrew S. Hoey, Mia O. Hoogenboom, Gang Liu, Michael J. McWilliam, Rachel J. Pears, Morgan S. Pratchett, William J. Skirving, Jessica S. Stella, Gergely Torda

Abstract

Global warming is rapidly emerging as a universal threat to ecological integrity and function, highlighting the urgent need for a better understanding of the impact of heat exposure on the resilience of ecosystems and the people who depend on them 1 . Here we show that in the aftermath of the record-breaking marine heatwave on the Great Barrier Reef in 2016 2 , corals began to die immediately on reefs where the accumulated heat exposure exceeded a critical threshold of degree heating weeks, which was 3-4 °C-weeks. After eight months, an exposure of 6 °C-weeks or more drove an unprecedented, regional-scale shift in the composition of coral assemblages, reflecting markedly divergent responses to heat stress by different taxa. Fast-growing staghorn and tabular corals suffered a catastrophic die-off, transforming the three-dimensionality and ecological functioning of 29% of the 3,863 reefs comprising the world's largest coral reef system. Our study bridges the gap between the theory and practice of assessing the risk of ecosystem collapse, under the emerging framework for the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Ecosystems 3 , by rigorously defining both the initial and collapsed states, identifying the major driver of change, and establishing quantitative collapse thresholds. The increasing prevalence of post-bleaching mass mortality of corals represents a radical shift in the disturbance regimes of tropical reefs, both adding to and far exceeding the influence of recurrent cyclones and other local pulse events, presenting a fundamental challenge to the long-term future of these iconic ecosystems.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4,438 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,430 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 1430 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 248 17%
Student > Bachelor 228 16%
Student > Master 212 15%
Researcher 194 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 52 4%
Other 166 12%
Unknown 330 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 361 25%
Environmental Science 328 23%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 109 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 77 5%
Engineering 20 1%
Other 143 10%
Unknown 392 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4688. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 December 2022.
All research outputs
#791
of 22,655,397 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#74
of 90,591 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10
of 326,234 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#1
of 916 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,655,397 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 90,591 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 99.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 326,234 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 916 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.