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Obesity and unhealthy lifestyle associated with poor executive function among Malaysian adolescents

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, April 2018
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Title
Obesity and unhealthy lifestyle associated with poor executive function among Malaysian adolescents
Published in
PLOS ONE, April 2018
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0195934
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joyce Ying Hui Tee, Wan Ying Gan, Kit-Aun Tan, Yit Siew Chin

Abstract

The understanding on the roles of obesity and lifestyle behaviors in predicting executive function of adolescents has been limited. Low executive function proficiency may have adverse effects on adolescents' school academic performance. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the relationship between BMI-for-age and multiple lifestyle behaviors (operationalized as meal consumption, physical activity, and sleep quality) with executive function (operationalized as inhibition, working memory, and cognitive flexibility) on a sample of Malaysian adolescents aged between 12 and 16 years (N = 513). Participants were recruited from two randomly selected schools in the state of Selangor in Malaysia. Using a self-administered questionnaire, parent participants provided information concerning their sociodemographic data, whereas adolescent participants provided information regarding their meal consumptions, physical activity, and sleep quality. The modified Harvard step test was used to assess adolescents' aerobic fitness, while Stroop color-word, digit span, and trail-making tests were used to assess adolescents' inhibition, working memory, and cognitive flexibility, respectively. Three separate hierarchical regression analyses were conducted for each outcome namely, inhibition, working memory, and cognitive flexibility. After adjusted for sociodemographic factors and BMI-for-age, differential predictors of inhibition and working memory were found. Habitual sleep efficiency significantly and positively predicted inhibition. Regular dinner intakes, physical activity levels, and sleep quality significantly and positively predicted working memory. Household income emerged as a consistent predictor for all executive function domains. In conclusion, an increased trend of obesity and unhealthy lifestyles among adolescents were found to be associated with poorer executive function. Regular dinner intakes, higher physical activity levels and better sleep quality predicted better executive function despite the inverse relationship between obesity and executive function. Future studies may explore how lifestyle modifications can optimize the development of executive function in adolescents as well as relieve the burden of obesity.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 328 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 328 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 65 20%
Student > Master 40 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 5%
Student > Postgraduate 11 3%
Other 44 13%
Unknown 118 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 39 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 35 11%
Psychology 30 9%
Sports and Recreations 28 9%
Social Sciences 15 5%
Other 52 16%
Unknown 129 39%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 April 2018.
All research outputs
#18,603,172
of 23,043,346 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#156,682
of 196,510 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#253,819
of 327,033 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#2,721
of 3,462 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,043,346 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 196,510 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.2. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 3,462 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.