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Freshening by glacial meltwater enhances melting of ice shelves and reduces formation of Antarctic Bottom Water

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
31 news outlets
blogs
9 blogs
twitter
322 X users
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
4 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

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145 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
263 Mendeley
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Title
Freshening by glacial meltwater enhances melting of ice shelves and reduces formation of Antarctic Bottom Water
Published in
Science Advances, April 2018
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.aap9467
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alessandro Silvano, Stephen Rich Rintoul, Beatriz Peña-Molino, William Richard Hobbs, Esmee van Wijk, Shigeru Aoki, Takeshi Tamura, Guy Darvall Williams

Abstract

Strong heat loss and brine release during sea ice formation in coastal polynyas act to cool and salinify waters on the Antarctic continental shelf. Polynya activity thus both limits the ocean heat flux to the Antarctic Ice Sheet and promotes formation of Dense Shelf Water (DSW), the precursor to Antarctic Bottom Water. However, despite the presence of strong polynyas, DSW is not formed on the Sabrina Coast in East Antarctica and in the Amundsen Sea in West Antarctica. Using a simple ocean model driven by observed forcing, we show that freshwater input from basal melt of ice shelves partially offsets the salt flux by sea ice formation in polynyas found in both regions, preventing full-depth convection and formation of DSW. In the absence of deep convection, warm water that reaches the continental shelf in the bottom layer does not lose much heat to the atmosphere and is thus available to drive the rapid basal melt observed at the Totten Ice Shelf on the Sabrina Coast and at the Dotson and Getz ice shelves in the Amundsen Sea. Our results suggest that increased glacial meltwater input in a warming climate will both reduce Antarctic Bottom Water formation and trigger increased mass loss from the Antarctic Ice Sheet, with consequences for the global overturning circulation and sea level rise.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 322 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 263 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 263 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 53 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 16%
Student > Master 37 14%
Student > Bachelor 19 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 4%
Other 41 16%
Unknown 59 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 131 50%
Environmental Science 34 13%
Physics and Astronomy 8 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 2%
Other 16 6%
Unknown 63 24%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 492. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 February 2024.
All research outputs
#55,110
of 26,012,510 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#672
of 12,737 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,254
of 343,959 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#17
of 237 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,012,510 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,737 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 119.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 343,959 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 237 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.