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Dominance rank is associated with body condition in outdoor-living domestic horses (Equus caballus)

Overview of attention for article published in Applied Animal Behaviour Science, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
42 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Dominance rank is associated with body condition in outdoor-living domestic horses (Equus caballus)
Published in
Applied Animal Behaviour Science, May 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.applanim.2015.02.019
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah L. Giles, Christine J. Nicol, Patricia A. Harris, Sean A. Rands

Abstract

The aim of our study was to explore the association between dominance rank and body condition in outdoor group-living domestic horses, Equus caballus. Social interactions were recorded using a video camera during a feeding test, applied to 203 horses in 42 herds. Dominance rank was assigned to 194 individuals. The outcome variable body condition score (BCS) was recorded using a 9-point scale. The variables age and height were recorded and considered as potential confounders or effect modifiers. Results were analysed using multivariable linear and logistic regression techniques, controlling for herd group as a random effect. More dominant (p = 0.001) individuals generally had a higher body condition score (p = 0.001) and this association was entirely independent of age and height. In addition, a greater proportion of dominant individuals fell into the obese category (BCS ≥ 7/9, p = 0.005). There were more displacement encounters and a greater level of interactivity in herds that had less variation in age and height, lending strength to the hypothesis that phenotypic variation may aid cohesion in group-living species. In addition there was a strong quadratic relationship between age and dominance rank (p < 0.001), where middle-aged individuals were most likely to be dominant. These results are the first to link behavioural predictors to body condition and obesity status in horses and should prompt the future consideration of behavioural and social factors when evaluating clinical disease risk in group-living animals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Argentina 1 2%
Unknown 40 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 29%
Student > Master 7 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 17%
Researcher 6 14%
Other 4 10%
Other 6 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 50%
Unspecified 8 19%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 10%
Environmental Science 3 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 5%
Other 4 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 June 2015.
All research outputs
#951,515
of 7,983,071 outputs
Outputs from Applied Animal Behaviour Science
#214
of 1,066 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,555
of 200,561 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Applied Animal Behaviour Science
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,983,071 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,066 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 200,561 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.