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Home Range Use and Movement Patterns of Non-Native Feral Goats in a Tropical Island Montane Dry Landscape

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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72 Mendeley
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Title
Home Range Use and Movement Patterns of Non-Native Feral Goats in a Tropical Island Montane Dry Landscape
Published in
PLOS ONE, March 2015
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0119231
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mark W. Chynoweth, Christopher A. Lepczyk, Creighton M. Litton, Steven C. Hess, James R. Kellner, Susan Cordell

Abstract

Advances in wildlife telemetry and remote sensing technology facilitate studies of broad-scale movements of ungulates in relation to phenological shifts in vegetation. In tropical island dry landscapes, home range use and movements of non-native feral goats (Capra hircus) are largely unknown, yet this information is important to help guide the conservation and restoration of some of the world's most critically endangered ecosystems. We hypothesized that feral goats would respond to resource pulses in vegetation by traveling to areas of recent green-up. To address this hypothesis, we fitted six male and seven female feral goats with Global Positioning System (GPS) collars equipped with an Argos satellite upload link to examine goat movements in relation to the plant phenology using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Movement patterns of 50% of males and 40% of females suggested conditional movement between non-overlapping home ranges throughout the year. A shift in NDVI values corresponded with movement between primary and secondary ranges of goats that exhibited long-distance movement, suggesting that vegetation phenology as captured by NDVI is a good indicator of the habitat and movement patterns of feral goats in tropical island dry landscapes. In the context of conservation and restoration of tropical island landscapes, the results of our study identify how non-native feral goats use resources across a broad landscape to sustain their populations and facilitate invasion of native plant communities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
France 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 68 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 24%
Student > Master 16 22%
Researcher 12 17%
Other 6 8%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 5 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 50%
Environmental Science 15 21%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 3%
Computer Science 1 1%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 13 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2015.
All research outputs
#6,526,777
of 12,091,691 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#60,585
of 133,029 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,989
of 217,344 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#2,189
of 4,666 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,091,691 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 133,029 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 217,344 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,666 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.