↓ Skip to main content

Metabolic retroconversion of trimethylamine N-oxide and the gut microbiota

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, April 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
18 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
66 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
107 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Metabolic retroconversion of trimethylamine N-oxide and the gut microbiota
Published in
Microbiome, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40168-018-0461-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lesley Hoyles, Maria L. Jiménez-Pranteda, Julien Chilloux, Francois Brial, Antonis Myridakis, Thomas Aranias, Christophe Magnan, Glenn R. Gibson, Jeremy D. Sanderson, Jeremy K. Nicholson, Dominique Gauguier, Anne L. McCartney, Marc-Emmanuel Dumas

Abstract

The dietary methylamines choline, carnitine, and phosphatidylcholine are used by the gut microbiota to produce a range of metabolites, including trimethylamine (TMA). However, little is known about the use of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) by this consortium of microbes. A feeding study using deuterated TMAO in C57BL6/J mice demonstrated microbial conversion of TMAO to TMA, with uptake of TMA into the bloodstream and its conversion to TMAO. Microbial activity necessary to convert TMAO to TMA was suppressed in antibiotic-treated mice, with deuterated TMAO being taken up directly into the bloodstream. In batch-culture fermentation systems inoculated with human faeces, growth of Enterobacteriaceae was stimulated in the presence of TMAO. Human-derived faecal and caecal bacteria (n = 66 isolates) were screened on solid and liquid media for their ability to use TMAO, with metabolites in spent media analysed by 1H-NMR. As with the in vitro fermentation experiments, TMAO stimulated the growth of Enterobacteriaceae; these bacteria produced most TMA from TMAO. Caecal/small intestinal isolates of Escherichia coli produced more TMA from TMAO than their faecal counterparts. Lactic acid bacteria produced increased amounts of lactate when grown in the presence of TMAO but did not produce large amounts of TMA. Clostridia (sensu stricto), bifidobacteria, and coriobacteria were significantly correlated with TMA production in the mixed fermentation system but did not produce notable quantities of TMA from TMAO in pure culture. Reduction of TMAO by the gut microbiota (predominantly Enterobacteriaceae) to TMA followed by host uptake of TMA into the bloodstream from the intestine and its conversion back to TMAO by host hepatic enzymes is an example of metabolic retroconversion. TMAO influences microbial metabolism depending on isolation source and taxon of gut bacterium. Correlation of metabolomic and abundance data from mixed microbiota fermentation systems did not give a true picture of which members of the gut microbiota were responsible for converting TMAO to TMA; only by supplementing the study with pure culture work and additional metabolomics was it possible to increase our understanding of TMAO bioconversions by the human gut microbiota.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 107 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 20%
Student > Master 11 10%
Professor 7 7%
Student > Bachelor 7 7%
Other 20 19%
Unknown 15 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 12 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 7%
Other 20 19%
Unknown 18 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 March 2019.
All research outputs
#1,130,457
of 14,414,290 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#439
of 806 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,450
of 275,428 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,414,290 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 806 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 38.8. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,428 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them