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Improving paediatric outreach services for urban Aboriginal children through partnerships: views of community-based service providers

Overview of attention for article published in Child: Care, Health & Development, March 2015
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Title
Improving paediatric outreach services for urban Aboriginal children through partnerships: views of community-based service providers
Published in
Child: Care, Health & Development, March 2015
DOI 10.1111/cch.12246
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. L. Thomas, K. Williams, J. Ritchie, K. Zwi

Abstract

In Australia, Aboriginal children experience significantly poorer health outcomes compared with non-Aboriginal children. Health policies aimed at improving Aboriginal health outcomes include interventions in the early childhood period. There is a need for government health services to work in partnership with Aboriginal people and other services to achieve the highest level of health possible for Aboriginal children, who often require a range of services to meet complex needs. This paper describes the views of service providers on how paediatric outreach services work in partnership with other services, Aboriginal families and the community and how those partnerships could be improved to maximize health outcomes for children. In-depth, semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with managers and service providers over a 6-week period in 2010. The views and suggestions of participants were documented and a thematic analysis was undertaken. Analysis of two focus groups with seven service providers and five individual interviews with service managers resulted in the identification of four themes: (i) using informal and formal ways of working; (ii) cultivating effective relationships; (iii) demonstrating cultural sensitivity; and (iv) forging strong leadership. Use of formal and informal approaches facilitated effective relationships between service providers and Aboriginal families and communities. Partnerships with the community were founded on a culturally appropriate model of care that recognized a holistic approach to health and wellness. Leadership emerged as an essential component of effective partnerships, cultivating the ethos of the workplace and creating an environment where collaboration is supported. Culturally appropriate child health services, which utilize effective relationships and employ a range of informal and formal collaboration with other services and community members, are well positioned to implement health policy and improve access to services for Aboriginal children with better health outcomes as a result.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 86 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 85 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 19%
Researcher 11 13%
Student > Bachelor 11 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 9%
Other 18 21%
Unknown 14 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 16 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 16%
Social Sciences 11 13%
Psychology 10 12%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 5%
Other 14 16%
Unknown 17 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 March 2015.
All research outputs
#9,863,007
of 12,352,333 outputs
Outputs from Child: Care, Health & Development
#732
of 914 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#157,415
of 224,657 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Child: Care, Health & Development
#37
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,352,333 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 914 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,657 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.