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Symptoms, unmet needs, psychological well-being and health status in survivors of prostate cancer: implications for redesigning follow-up

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Urology, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
16 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
64 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
138 Mendeley
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Title
Symptoms, unmet needs, psychological well-being and health status in survivors of prostate cancer: implications for redesigning follow-up
Published in
British Journal of Urology, May 2015
DOI 10.1111/bju.13122
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eila Watson, Bethany Shinkins, Emma Frith, David Neal, Freddie Hamdy, Fiona Walter, David Weller, Clare Wilkinson, Sara Faithfull, Jane Wolstenholme, Prasanna Sooriakumaran, Christof Kastner, Christine Campbell, Richard Neal, Hugh Butcher, Mike Matthews, Rafael Perera, Peter Rose

Abstract

To explore ongoing symptoms, unmet needs, psychological wellbeing, self-efficacy and overall health status in prostate cancer survivors. An invitation to participate in a postal questionnaire survey was sent to 546 men, diagnosed with prostate cancer 9 - 24 months previously at two UK cancer centres. The study group comprised men who had been subject to a range of treatments: surgery, radiotherapy, hormone therapy and active surveillance. The questionnaire included measures of prostate-related quality of life (EPIC-26); unmet needs (SCNS SF34); anxiety and depression (HADS), self-efficacy (modified Self-efficacy Scale), health status (EQ-5D) and satisfaction with care (questions developed for study). A single reminder was sent to non-responders after three weeks. Data were analysed by age, co-morbidities, and treatment group. 316 men completed questionnaires (64.1% response rate). Overall satisfaction with follow-up care was high, but was lower for psychosocial than physical aspects of care. Urinary, bowel, and sexual functioning was reported as a moderate/big problem in the last month for 15.2% (n = 48), 5.1% (n = 16), and 36.5% (n = 105) men, respectively. The most commonly reported moderate/high unmet needs related to changes in sexual feelings/relationships, managing fear of recurrence/uncertainty, and concerns about the worries of significant others. It was found that 17% of men (n = 51/307) reported potentially moderate to severe levels of anxiety and 10.2% reported moderate to severe levels of depression (n = 32/308). The presence of problematic side-effects was associated with higher psychological morbidity, poorer self-efficacy, greater unmet needs, and poorer overall health status. While some men report relatively few problems following prostate cancer treatment, this study highlights important physical and psycho-social issues for a significant minority of prostate cancer survivors. Strategies for identifying those men with on-going problems, alongside new interventions and models of care, tailored to individual needs, are needed to improve quality of life. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 138 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 135 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 23 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 16%
Student > Master 19 14%
Professor 14 10%
Unspecified 14 10%
Other 46 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 33 24%
Unspecified 22 16%
Psychology 17 12%
Computer Science 12 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 9%
Other 42 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 20. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 August 2019.
All research outputs
#837,032
of 13,777,184 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Urology
#207
of 4,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,116
of 224,202 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Urology
#8
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,777,184 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,359 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,202 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.