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Physical Activity in the Prevention of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: Probable Association

Overview of attention for article published in International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology, August 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 196)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
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Title
Physical Activity in the Prevention of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: Probable Association
Published in
International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology, August 2014
DOI 10.1055/s-0034-1384815
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jéssica Bazoni, William Mendes, Caroline Meneses-Barriviera, Juliana Melo, Viviane Costa, Denilson Teixeira, Luciana Marchiori

Abstract

Introduction Physical inactivity is an important risk factor for many age-related diseases and symptoms such as dizziness and vertigo. Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the possible association between benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and regular physical activity in elderly subjects. Methods This cross-sectional study included 491 elderly individuals who lived independently. Physical exercise was assessed through a questionnaire and BPPV by history and the Dix-Hallpike maneuver. Results The present study indicates no significant association between BPPV with lack of physical activity in men and in the total population. We have confirmed associations between BPPV with lack of physical activity in women (p = 0.01). Women with a sedentary lifestyle who do not practice physical activity are 2.62 more likely to have BPPV than those with regular physical activity. Conclusion These results highlight the importance of identifying risk factors for BPPV that can be modified through specific interventions. Regular physical activity is a lifestyle with potential to decrease the risk of vertigo in women.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 4%
Unknown 22 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 9%
Researcher 2 9%
Other 6 26%
Unknown 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 35%
Neuroscience 2 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 9%
Psychology 1 4%
Linguistics 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 8 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2015.
All research outputs
#3,530,510
of 14,258,591 outputs
Outputs from International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology
#3
of 196 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,185
of 225,143 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology
#1
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,258,591 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 196 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 0.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 225,143 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.