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Development and Application of a Blastocystis Subtype-Specific PCR Assay Reveals that Mixed-Subtype Infections Are Common in a Healthy Human Population

Overview of attention for article published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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34 Dimensions

Readers on

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59 Mendeley
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Title
Development and Application of a Blastocystis Subtype-Specific PCR Assay Reveals that Mixed-Subtype Infections Are Common in a Healthy Human Population
Published in
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, June 2015
DOI 10.1128/aem.00520-15
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pauline D. Scanlan, Christen Rune Stensvold, Paul D. Cotter

Abstract

The human gut is host to a diversity of microorganisms including the single-celled microbial eukaryote Blastocystis. Research has shown that most carriers host a single Blastocystis subtype (ST), which is unusual given the considerable within-host species diversity observed for other microbial genera in this ecosystem. However, our limited knowledge of both the incidence and biological significance of Blastocystis diversity within hosts (i.e. so-called mixed infections) is likely due to problems with existing methodologies. Here, we developed and applied Blastocystis ST-specific PCRs for the investigation of the most common subtypes of Blastocystis, (ST1-ST4), to a healthy human cohort (N = 50). We detected mixed infections in 22% of the cases, all of which had been identified as single ST infections in an earlier study using state-of-the-art methods. Our results show that certain STs occur predominantly as either single (ST3 and 4) or mixed infections (ST1), which may reflect inter alia transient colonisation patterns and/or co-operative or competitive interactions between different STs. Comparative analyses with other primers that have been used extensively for ST-specific analysis found them unsuitable for detection of mixed and, in some cases, single ST infections. Collectively, our data shed new light on the diversity of Blastocystis within and between human hosts. Moreover, the development of these PCR assays will facilitate future work into the molecular epidemiology and significance of mixed infections in groups of interest, including health and disease cohorts, and also help identify sources of Blastocystis transmission to humans, including identifying potential animal and environmental reservoirs.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 17%
Researcher 10 17%
Student > Master 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 10 17%
Unknown 7 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 22%
Immunology and Microbiology 9 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 15%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 3%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 9 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 October 2015.
All research outputs
#845,292
of 12,508,562 outputs
Outputs from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#494
of 9,509 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,107
of 223,405 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#7
of 160 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,508,562 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,509 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,405 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 160 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.