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Antibiotic Prescribing in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Meta-synthesis of Qualitative Research

Overview of attention for article published in Drugs & Aging, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
twitter
16 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
32 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
108 Mendeley
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Title
Antibiotic Prescribing in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Meta-synthesis of Qualitative Research
Published in
Drugs & Aging, April 2015
DOI 10.1007/s40266-015-0252-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aoife Fleming, Colin Bradley, Shane Cullinan, Stephen Byrne

Abstract

The objective of this review was to synthesize the findings of qualitative studies investigating the factors influencing antibiotic prescribing in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). These findings will inform the development of future antimicrobial stewardship strategies (AMS) in this setting. We searched Embase, PubMed, PsycInfo, Social Science Citations Index and Google Scholar for all qualitative studies investigating health care professionals' views on antibiotic prescribing in LTCFs. The quality of the papers was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) assessment tool for qualitative research. Thematic synthesis was used to integrate the emergent themes into an overall analytical theme. The synthesis of eight qualitative studies indicated that health care professionals and administrators have identified factors that influence antibiotic prescribing in LTCFs. These factors include variations in knowledge and practice among health care professionals, and the LTCF context, which is unique given the complex patient population and restricted access to doctors and diagnostic tests. The social factors underpinning the interaction between nurses, residents' families and doctors also influence decision making around antibiotic prescribing. The study also found that there is an acknowledged need for collaborative, evidence-based AMS specific to LTCFs, as antibiotic prescribing is heavily influenced by factors unique to this setting. This review highlighted the key contextual challenges for AMS in LTCFs. The findings provide an in-depth insight into the factors-such as the LTCF context, social factors, variability in knowledge and prescribing practices, and antimicrobial resistance-that impact on antibiotic prescribing and AMS strategies. These factors must be considered in order to ensure the feasibility and applicability of future AMS interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 107 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 16%
Researcher 13 12%
Other 9 8%
Student > Bachelor 8 7%
Other 22 20%
Unknown 19 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 32 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 12 11%
Social Sciences 7 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 4%
Other 16 15%
Unknown 24 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 February 2022.
All research outputs
#2,019,538
of 21,301,913 outputs
Outputs from Drugs & Aging
#106
of 1,147 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,430
of 241,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Drugs & Aging
#2
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,301,913 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,147 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,796 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.