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Systolic blood pressure and short-term mortality in the emergency department and prehospital setting: a hospital-based cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
9 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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41 Mendeley
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Title
Systolic blood pressure and short-term mortality in the emergency department and prehospital setting: a hospital-based cohort study
Published in
Critical Care, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13054-015-0884-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anders Kasper Bruun Kristensen, Jon Gitz Holler, Søren Mikkelsen, Jesper Hallas, Annmarie Lassen

Abstract

Systolic blood pressure is a widely used tool to assess circulatory function in acutely ill patients. The systolic blood pressure limit where a given patient should be considered hypotensive is the subject of debate and recent studies have advocated higher systolic blood pressure thresholds than the traditional 90 mmHg. The aim of this study was to identify the best performing systolic blood pressure thresholds with regards to predicting 7-day mortality and to evaluate the applicability of these in the emergency department as well as in the prehospital setting. A retrospective, hospital-based cohort study was performed at Odense University Hospital which included all adult patients in the emergency department between 1995 and 2011, all patients transported to the emergency department in ambulances in the period 2012-2013, and all patients serviced by the physician staffed mobile emergency care unit in Odense between 2007 and 2013. We used the first recorded systolic blood pressure and the main outcome was 7-day mortality. Best performing thresholds were identified with methods based on receiver operating characteristics (ROC) and multivariate regression. The performance of systolic blood pressure thresholds was evaluated with standard summary statistics for diagnostic tests. 7-day mortality rates varied from 1.8 % (95 % CI [1.7, 1.9]) of 112,727 patients in the emergency department to 2.2 % (95 % CI [2.0, 2.5]) of 15,862 patients in the ambulance and 5.7 % (95 % CI [5.3, 6.2]) of 12,270 patients in the mobile emergency care units. Best performing thresholds ranged from 95 to 119 mmHg in the emergency department, 103-120 mmHg in the ambulance, and 101-115 mmHg in the MECU but area under the ROC curve indicated poor overall discriminatory performance of SBP thresholds in all cohorts. Systolic blood pressure alone is not sufficient to identify patients at risk regardless of the defined threshold for hypotension. If, however, a threshold is to be defined, a systolic blood pressure threshold of 100-110 mmHg is probably more relevant than the traditional 90 mmHg.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
Colombia 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 37 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 20%
Student > Master 5 12%
Other 4 10%
Professor 3 7%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 3 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 61%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Engineering 2 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 5 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 May 2019.
All research outputs
#1,238,027
of 15,051,489 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#1,197
of 4,717 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,956
of 227,121 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#1
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,051,489 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,717 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 227,121 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.