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Effects of senolytic drugs on human mesenchymal stromal cells

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of senolytic drugs on human mesenchymal stromal cells
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13287-018-0857-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Clara Grezella, Eduardo Fernandez-Rebollo, Julia Franzen, Mónica Sofia Ventura Ferreira, Fabian Beier, Wolfgang Wagner

Abstract

Senolytic drugs are thought to target senescent cells and might thereby rejuvenate tissues. In fact, such compounds were suggested to increase health and lifespan in various murine aging models. So far, effects of senolytic drugs have not been analysed during replicative senescence of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). In this study, we tested four potentially senolytic drugs: ABT-263 (navitoclax), quercetin, nicotinamide riboside, and danazol. The effects of these compounds were analysed during long-term expansion of MSCs, until replicative senescence. Furthermore, we determined the effect on molecular markers for replicative senescence, such as senescence-associated beta-galactosidase staining (SA-β-gal), telomere attrition, and senescence-associated DNA methylation changes. Co-culture experiments of fluorescently labelled early and late passages revealed that particularly ABT-263 had a significant but moderate senolytic effect. This was in line with reduced SA-β-gal staining in senescent MSCs upon treatment with ABT-263. However, none of the drugs had significant effects on the maximum number of population doublings, telomere length, or epigenetic senescence predictions. Of the four tested drugs, only ABT-263 revealed a senolytic effect in human MSCs-and even treatment with this compound did not rejuvenate MSCs with regard to telomere length or epigenetic senescence signature. It will be important to identify more potent senolytic drugs to meet the high hopes for regenerative medicine.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 57 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 26%
Researcher 11 19%
Student > Bachelor 7 12%
Student > Master 6 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 9 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 14%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 7%
Chemistry 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 11 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 March 2019.
All research outputs
#1,022,724
of 14,624,275 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#53
of 1,354 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,694
of 274,811 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,624,275 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,354 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,811 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them