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Gut microbiota depletion from early adolescence in mice: Implications for brain and behaviour

Overview of attention for article published in Brain, Behavior & Immunity, August 2015
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
35 tweeters
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1 patent
facebook
16 Facebook pages

Citations

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387 Dimensions

Readers on

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762 Mendeley
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Title
Gut microbiota depletion from early adolescence in mice: Implications for brain and behaviour
Published in
Brain, Behavior & Immunity, August 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.bbi.2015.04.004
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lieve Desbonnet, Gerard Clarke, Alexander Traplin, Orla O’Sullivan, Fiona Crispie, Rachel D. Moloney, Paul D. Cotter, Timothy G. Dinan, John F. Cryan

Abstract

There is growing appreciation for the importance of bacteria in shaping brain development and behaviour. Adolescence and early adulthood are crucial developmental periods during which exposure to harmful environmental factors can have a permanent impact on brain function. Such environmental factors include perturbations of the gut bacteria that may affect gut-brain communication, altering the trajectory of brain development, and increasing vulnerability to psychiatric disorders. Here we assess the effects of gut bacterial depletion from weaning onwards on adult cognitive, social and emotional behaviours and markers of gut-brain axis dysfunction in mice. Mice were treated with a combination of antibiotics from weaning onwards and effects on behaviours and potential brain-gut axis neuromodulators (tryptophan, monoamines, and neuropeptides) and BDNF expression were assessed in adulthood. Antibiotic-treatment depleted and restructured gut microbiota composition of caecal contents and decreased spleen weights in adulthood. Depletion of the gut microbiota from weaning onwards reduced anxiety, induced cognitive deficits, altered dynamics of the tryptophan metabolic pathway, and significantly reduced BDNF, oxytocin and vasopressin expression in the adult brain. Microbiota depletion from weaning onwards by means of chronic treatment with antibiotics in mice impacts on anxiety and cognitive behaviours as well as key neuromodulators of gut-brain communication in a manner that is similar to that reported in germ-free mice. This model may represent a more amenable alternative for germ-free mice in the assessment of microbiota modulation of behaviour. Finally, these data suggest that despite the presence of a normal gut microbiome in early postnatal life, reduced abundance and diversity of the gut microbiota from weaning influences adult behaviours and key neuromodulators of the microbiota-gut-brain axis suggesting that dysregulation of this axis in the post-weaning period may contribute to the pathogenesis of disorders associated with altered anxiety and cognition.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 35 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 762 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 750 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 147 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 131 17%
Student > Master 121 16%
Researcher 96 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 51 7%
Other 100 13%
Unknown 116 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 138 18%
Neuroscience 116 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 97 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 81 11%
Psychology 54 7%
Other 126 17%
Unknown 150 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 39. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 May 2021.
All research outputs
#733,546
of 19,391,192 outputs
Outputs from Brain, Behavior & Immunity
#240
of 2,834 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,341
of 237,035 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brain, Behavior & Immunity
#3
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,391,192 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,834 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,035 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.