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Gender differences in aggression of borderline personality disorder

Overview of attention for article published in Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation, April 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)

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5 tweeters
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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18 Dimensions

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59 Mendeley
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Title
Gender differences in aggression of borderline personality disorder
Published in
Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40479-015-0028-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Falk Mancke, Katja Bertsch, Sabine C Herpertz

Abstract

Aggression is a core feature of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Well-replicated results from the general population indicate that men engage in aggression more frequently than women. This article addresses the question of whether gender also influences aggression in BPD, and whether the neurobiological mechanisms underlying aggressive behavior differ between male and female BPD patients. Data show that most self-reports, interviews and behavioral tasks investigating samples of BPD patients do not find enhanced aggressiveness in male patients, suggesting that BPD attenuates rather than aggravates gender differences usually present in the general population. Neurobiological studies comparing BPD patients with gender-matched healthy controls, however, reveal a number of interesting gender differences: On the one hand, there are well-replicated findings of reduced amygdala and hippocampal gray matter volumes in female BPD patients, while these findings are not shared by male patients with BPD. On the other hand, only male BPD patients exhibit reduced gray matter volume of the anterior cingulate cortex, increased gray matter volume of the putamen, reduced striatal activity during an aggression task, and a more pronounced deficit in central serotonergic responsivity. These neurobiological findings point to a particular importance of impulsivity for the aggression of male BPD patients. Limitations include the need to control for confounding influences of comorbidities, particularly as male BPD patients have been consistently found to show higher percentages of aggression-predisposing comorbid disorders, such as antisocial personality disorder, than female BPD patients. In the future, studies which include systematic comparisons between females and males are warranted in order to disentangle gender differences in aggression of BPD patients with the aim of establishing gender-sensitive treatments where needed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 25%
Student > Bachelor 11 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Other 8 14%
Other 8 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 21 36%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 8%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Neuroscience 5 8%
Other 7 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 April 2018.
All research outputs
#3,603,145
of 12,749,777 outputs
Outputs from Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation
#55
of 94 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,433
of 223,787 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,749,777 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 94 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,787 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them