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Cross sectional analysis of Chicago vs suburban Cook County suicide deaths among 10–24-year-olds in the Illinois violent death reporting system

Overview of attention for article published in Injury Epidemiology, April 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
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5 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
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Title
Cross sectional analysis of Chicago vs suburban Cook County suicide deaths among 10–24-year-olds in the Illinois violent death reporting system
Published in
Injury Epidemiology, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40621-018-0142-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ernika G. Quimby, Suzanne G. McLone, Maryann Mason, Karen Sheehan

Abstract

In 2014, suicide was the second leading cause of death among 10- to 24-year-olds in the US. Studies note disparities in youth suicide based on sex, race/ethnicity, and urban vs rural settings. This study investigates demographics, mental health indicators, and other circumstances surrounding youth/young adult deaths by suicide, comparing Chicago and suburban Cook County from 2005 to 2010. Using the Illinois Violent Death Reporting System (IVDRS), we employed a cross-sectional design to provide descriptive analysis of decedents in three age groups (10-14, 15-19, and 20-24 years) in two geographic areas: urban (city of Chicago) and suburban (suburban Cook County) between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2010. We used chi-square testing to test for significant differences in each age group by demographics, mental health indicators, and suicide markers in each area. Between 2005 and 2010, the IVDRS reported 299 deaths by suicide among 10-24-year-olds, 52% in Chicago, and 48% in suburban Cook County. Of these deaths, 5.7%, 33.4% and 60.9% were ages 10-14, 15-19, and 20-24 years, respectively. Non-Hispanic (NH) whites comprised 50.7% of the totals, NH Blacks 26.5%, Hispanics 16.8%, and Asians 5.7%. In Chicago, males were 84% of suicides and 62.7% in suburban Cook County among 15-19-year-olds (p < 0.05). White race was significantly different in 10-14-year-olds: 0% in Chicago, 54% in suburban Cook County (p < 0.05). Racial and ethnic differences in suicides among 15-19-year-olds in Chicago vs suburban Cook County were: NH White 22.4% vs 74.5% (p < 0.001), NH Black 46.9% vs 13.7% (p < 0.05), Hispanic 24.5% vs 7.8% (p < 0.05). There were also differences for 20-24-year-olds with NH White 43% vs 65.4% and NH Black 32% vs 13.6% (p < 0.05 for both). For mechanism of death, in 15-19-year-olds, there were differences between city and suburban in firearm deaths (42.9% vs 20%, p < 0.05) and in poisoning (0 vs 14%, p < 0.05). Our analyses detected significant location-related differences in the characteristics of decedents within the Chicago region indicating that local data are needed to inform suicide prevention efforts so that those at most risk can be prioritized for services. IVDRS is a potent tool in identifying these variations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 5 19%
Researcher 3 11%
Student > Master 3 11%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Other 7 26%
Unknown 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 6 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 15%
Social Sciences 4 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 11%
Unspecified 2 7%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 4 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 July 2019.
All research outputs
#8,106,324
of 15,377,318 outputs
Outputs from Injury Epidemiology
#137
of 185 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,430
of 278,371 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Injury Epidemiology
#3
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,377,318 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 185 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.7. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,371 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.