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Effects of a formalized collaboration between plastic and orthopedic surgeons in severe extremity trauma patients; a retrospective study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Trauma Management & Outcomes, April 2015
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1 tweeter

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16 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of a formalized collaboration between plastic and orthopedic surgeons in severe extremity trauma patients; a retrospective study
Published in
Journal of Trauma Management & Outcomes, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13032-015-0023-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pehr Sommar, Yamin Granberg, Martin Halle, Ann-Charlott Docherty Skogh, Kalle T Lundgren, Karl-Åke Jansson

Abstract

Severe trauma to the extremities often includes a combination of fractures and soft tissue injuries. Several publications support that the patient outcome is better when skeletal stabilization is followed by early soft-tissue coverage. In an effort to optimize the treatment of these patients, we established a formalized collaboration in 2008 between the Departments of reconstructive plastic surgery and orthopedics at the Karolinska University Hospital. A retrospective review was conducted for all patients who had suffered severe extremity trauma and received either a free or a pedicled flap for extremity reconstruction. We compared the management of patients 0-4 years before and 0-4 years after the collaboration started especially with respect to; choice of flap, time to flap coverage, number of operations/revisions, total in-hospital stay. After initiation of the collaboration, the number of flaps increased from 13 flaps (5 free and 8 pedicled) to 44 flaps (21 free and 23 pedicled). Fewer postoperative revisions was seen, as well as shorter in-hospital stay. The present study highlights the importance of formalized collaboration between orthopedic and plastic surgeons in severe extremity trauma patients. The concept of an interdisciplinary approach has led to an increased number of trauma patients referred for plastic surgical consultation, an increased number of flaps, fewer postoperative revisions and shorter hospital stay.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 4 25%
Student > Master 3 19%
Unspecified 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Other 3 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 81%
Unspecified 3 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 April 2015.
All research outputs
#2,657,491
of 5,005,300 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Trauma Management & Outcomes
#22
of 44 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,282
of 153,627 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Trauma Management & Outcomes
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,005,300 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 44 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.0. This one scored the same or higher as 22 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 153,627 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them