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Effects of a bundled Antimicrobial Stewardship Program on mortality: a cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#24 of 466)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
134 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of a bundled Antimicrobial Stewardship Program on mortality: a cohort study
Published in
Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases, May 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.bjid.2015.02.005
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lucas Miyake Okumura, Monica Maria Gomes da Silva, Izelandia Veroneze

Abstract

To assess a bundled Antimicrobial Stewardship Program and its effect on mortality. Eight months of clinical electronic medical records and Antimicrobial Stewardship Program registries were used as source of data. This is a historical cohort study conducted in a Brazilian University Hospital. Eligible patients were admitted to general wards or intensive care units and had an antimicrobial therapy prescribed and assessed by different strategies: Bundled Antimicrobial Stewardship Program (bundled intervention consisted of clinical pharmacist chart review, discussion with microbiologist and infectious disease physicians, local education and continuous follow-up) or Conventional Antimicrobial Stewardship Program (clinical pharmacist chart review and discussion with infectious disease physician). Primary outcome from this study was 30-day mortality, which was compared between groups, by using Kaplan-Meier survival curve and log-rank test. Other outcomes included Defined Daily Doses per 1000 patient-days and occurrence of resistant bacteria. From 533 patients, 491 were eligible for the study, of which 191 patients were included to Antimicrobial Stewardship Program and 300 to Conventional strategy. In general, they were likely to be male and age was similar in groups (58.9 vs 55.5 years, p=0.38). Likewise, Charlson Comorbidity Index was not statistically different between groups (2.6 vs 2.7, p=0.2). Bloodstream site infections were frequently diagnosed in both groups (30.89% vs 26%, p=0.24). Other less common sites of infections were central nervous system and lungs. The ASP group had higher survival rates (p<0.01) and the risk difference was 10.8% (95% CI: 2.41-19.14). There were less Defined Daily Doses per 1000 patient-days (417 vs 557.2, p<0.05) and higher rates of resistant bacteria identified in the ASP group (83% vs 17%). Bundled ASP was the most effective strategy, with reduced mortality and Defined Daily Doses per 1000 patient-days.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 134 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 133 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 12%
Student > Postgraduate 14 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 10%
Student > Bachelor 13 10%
Other 37 28%
Unknown 24 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 49 37%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 28 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 4%
Psychology 4 3%
Other 15 11%
Unknown 27 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2019.
All research outputs
#2,577,968
of 15,641,217 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases
#24
of 466 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,995
of 230,667 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases
#1
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,641,217 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 466 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 230,667 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them