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Biodiversity influences plant productivity through niche–efficiency

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
20 tweeters

Citations

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25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
182 Mendeley
Title
Biodiversity influences plant productivity through niche–efficiency
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2015
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1409853112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jingjing Liang, Mo Zhou, Patrick C. Tobin, A. David McGuire, Peter B. Reich

Abstract

The loss of biodiversity is threatening ecosystem productivity and services worldwide, spurring efforts to quantify its effects on the functioning of natural ecosystems. Previous research has focused on the positive role of biodiversity on resource acquisition (i.e., niche complementarity), but a lack of study on resource utilization efficiency, a link between resource and productivity, has rendered it difficult to quantify the biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationship. Here we demonstrate that biodiversity loss reduces plant productivity, other things held constant, through theory, empirical evidence, and simulations under gradually relaxed assumptions. We developed a theoretical model named niche-efficiency to integrate niche complementarity and a heretofore-ignored mechanism of diminishing marginal productivity in quantifying the effects of biodiversity loss on plant productivity. Based on niche-efficiency, we created a relative productivity metric and a productivity impact index (PII) to assist in biological conservation and resource management. Relative productivity provides a standardized measure of the influence of biodiversity on individual productivity, and PII is a functionally based taxonomic index to assess individual species' inherent value in maintaining current ecosystem productivity. Empirical evidence from the Alaska boreal forest suggests that every 1% reduction in overall plant diversity could render an average of 0.23% decline in individual tree productivity. Out of the 283 plant species of the region, we found that large woody plants generally have greater PII values than other species. This theoretical model would facilitate the integration of biological conservation in the international campaign against several pressing global issues involving energy use, climate change, and poverty.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 182 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 3 2%
United States 2 1%
Japan 2 1%
Spain 2 1%
Mexico 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Nepal 1 <1%
Philippines 1 <1%
Other 3 2%
Unknown 165 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 52 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 45 25%
Student > Master 23 13%
Student > Bachelor 16 9%
Unspecified 11 6%
Other 35 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 85 47%
Environmental Science 51 28%
Unspecified 22 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 3%
Other 13 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 May 2015.
All research outputs
#658,512
of 12,960,324 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#11,767
of 79,114 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,713
of 225,849 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#335
of 963 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,960,324 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,114 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 225,849 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 963 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.