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Moisture rivals temperature in limiting photosynthesis by trees establishing beyond their cold-edge range limit under ambient and warmed conditions

Overview of attention for article published in New Phytologist, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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37 Dimensions

Readers on

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72 Mendeley
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Title
Moisture rivals temperature in limiting photosynthesis by trees establishing beyond their cold-edge range limit under ambient and warmed conditions
Published in
New Phytologist, April 2015
DOI 10.1111/nph.13422
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew B. Moyes, Matthew J. Germino, Lara M. Kueppers

Abstract

Climate change is altering plant species distributions globally, and warming is expected to promote uphill shifts in mountain trees. However, at many cold-edge range limits, such as alpine treelines in the western United States, tree establishment may be colimited by low temperature and low moisture, making recruitment patterns with warming difficult to predict. We measured response functions linking carbon (C) assimilation and temperature- and moisture-related microclimatic factors for limber pine (Pinus flexilis) seedlings growing in a heating × watering experiment within and above the alpine treeline. We then extrapolated these response functions using observed microclimate conditions to estimate the net effects of warming and associated soil drying on C assimilation across an entire growing season. Moisture and temperature limitations were each estimated to reduce potential growing season C gain from a theoretical upper limit by 15-30% (c. 50% combined). Warming above current treeline conditions provided relatively little benefit to modeled net assimilation, whereas assimilation was sensitive to either wetter or drier conditions. Summer precipitation may be at least as important as temperature in constraining C gain by establishing subalpine trees at and above current alpine treelines as seasonally dry subalpine and alpine ecosystems continue to warm.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 71 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 26%
Student > Master 17 24%
Researcher 16 22%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 7%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 4 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 46%
Environmental Science 23 32%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 7 10%
Social Sciences 1 1%
Unknown 8 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 May 2015.
All research outputs
#6,945,865
of 12,349,332 outputs
Outputs from New Phytologist
#3,750
of 4,963 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,832
of 228,272 outputs
Outputs of similar age from New Phytologist
#150
of 211 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,349,332 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,963 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.4. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 228,272 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 211 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.