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Effects of increased paternal age on sperm quality, reproductive outcome and associated epigenetic risks to offspring

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#7 of 946)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
34 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
162 tweeters
patent
1 patent
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
4 Wikipedia pages
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
225 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
453 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of increased paternal age on sperm quality, reproductive outcome and associated epigenetic risks to offspring
Published in
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12958-015-0028-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rakesh Sharma, Ashok Agarwal, Vikram K Rohra, Mourad Assidi, Muhammad Abu-Elmagd, Rola F Turki

Abstract

Over the last decade, there has been a significant increase in average paternal age when the first child is conceived, either due to increased life expectancy, widespread use of contraception, late marriages and other factors. While the effect of maternal ageing on fertilization and reproduction is well known and several studies have shown that women over 35 years have a higher risk of infertility, pregnancy complications, spontaneous abortion, congenital anomalies, and perinatal complications. The effect of paternal age on semen quality and reproductive function is controversial for several reasons. First, there is no universal definition for advanced paternal ageing. Secondly, the literature is full of studies with conflicting results, especially for the most common parameters tested. Advancing paternal age also has been associated with increased risk of genetic disease. Our exhaustive literature review has demonstrated negative effects on sperm quality and testicular functions with increasing paternal age. Epigenetics changes, DNA mutations along with chromosomal aneuploidies have been associated with increasing paternal age. In addition to increased risk of male infertility, paternal age has also been demonstrated to impact reproductive and fertility outcomes including a decrease in IVF/ICSI success rate and increasing rate of preterm birth. Increasing paternal age has shown to increase the incidence of different types of disorders like autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorders, and childhood leukemia in the progeny. It is thereby essential to educate the infertile couples on the disturbing links between increased paternal age and rising disorders in their offspring, to better counsel them during their reproductive years.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 162 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 453 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 449 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 78 17%
Researcher 64 14%
Student > Master 57 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 51 11%
Other 25 6%
Other 94 21%
Unknown 84 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 119 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 58 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 58 13%
Psychology 24 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 23 5%
Other 65 14%
Unknown 106 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 427. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2022.
All research outputs
#51,752
of 22,143,852 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#7
of 946 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#561
of 245,144 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,143,852 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 946 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 245,144 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them