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Some aspects of interactivity between endocrine and immune systems required for successful reproduction

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, April 2015
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

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2 Facebook pages
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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3 Dimensions

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12 Mendeley
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Title
Some aspects of interactivity between endocrine and immune systems required for successful reproduction
Published in
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12958-015-0020-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrea Weghofer, Eric Himaya, Vitaly A Kushnir, David H Barad, Emanuela Lazzaroni-Tealdi, Yao Yu, Yan-Guang Wu, Norbert Gleicher

Abstract

In successful reproduction, endocrine and immune systems closely interact. We here attempt to further elucidate the relationship between androgen levels, systemic activation of the immune system and reproductive success in infertile women, utilizing 2 distinct infertile patient cohorts. In Group 1, we investigated 322 women (ages 38.6 +/- 5.4 years) at initial presentation; in Group 2 125 women undergoing in vitro fertilization (169 IVF cycles, ages 38.9 +/- 5.5 years). In Group 1, we assessed androgens and an immune panel, previously demonstrated to discriminate between activated quiescent immune systems; in Group 2, utilizing the same immune panel, we investigated whether immune system activation relates to embryo quality in IVF cycles. No individual immune test within the immune panel was associated with androgen levels. The total/free testosterone ratio (TT/FT) was, however, significantly associated with presence of gammopathies (in IgG, IgM, IgA, IgE; P = 0.026). Surprisingly, immune system activation was associated with significantly improved embryo quality (P = 0.008), a finding persistent after adjustment for age and repeat IVF cycles (P = 0.006). Association of immune system activation with improved embryo quality concurs with previously reported immune activation in association with normal functional ovarian reserve (FOR) and normal androgen levels, while, counter intuitively, hypoandrogenism and low FOR are associated with lack of immune system activation. Mild immune system activation, therefore, likely appears essential for establishment of pregnancy, and may be regulated by androgens.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 25%
Researcher 2 17%
Unspecified 1 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Other 3 25%
Unknown 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 17%
Unspecified 1 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2015.
All research outputs
#2,358,356
of 5,141,487 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#127
of 303 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,918
of 158,653 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#7
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,141,487 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 303 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 158,653 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.