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What variables should be considered in allocating Primary health care Pharmaceutical budgets to districts in Uganda?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, January 2015
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Title
What variables should be considered in allocating Primary health care Pharmaceutical budgets to districts in Uganda?
Published in
Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40545-014-0023-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paschal N Mujasi, Jaume Puig-Junoy

Abstract

A key policy question for the government of Uganda is how to equitably allocate primary health care pharmaceutical budgets to districts. This paper seeks to identify variables influencing current primary health care pharmaceutical expenditure and their usefulness in allocating prospective pharmaceutical budgets to districts. This was a cross sectional, retrospective observational study using secondary administrative data. We collected data on the value of pharmaceuticals procured by primary health care facilities in each district from National Medical Stores for the financial year 2011/2012. The dependent variable was expressed as per capita district pharmaceutical expenditure. By reviewing literature we identified 26 potential explanatory variables. They include supply, need and demand, and health system organization variables that may influence the demand and supply of health services and the corresponding pharmaceutical expenditure. We collected secondary data for these variables for all the districts in Uganda (n = 112). We performed econometric analysis to estimate parameters of various regression models. There is a significant correlation between per capita district pharmaceutical expenditure and total district population, rural poverty, access to drinking water and outpatient department (OPD) per capita utilisation.(P < 0.01). The percentage of health centre IIIs (HC III) among each district's health facilities is significantly correlated with per capita pharmaceutical expenditure (P < 0.05). OPD per capita utilisation has a relatively strong correlation with per capita pharmaceutical expenditure (r = 0.498); all the other significant factors are weakly correlated with per capita pharmaceutical expenditure (r < 0.5). From several iterations of an initially developed model, the proposed final model for explaining per capita pharmaceutical expenditure explains about 53% of the variation in pharmaceutical expenditure among districts in Uganda (Adjusted R(2) = 0.528). All variables in the model are significant (p < 0.01). From evaluation of the various models, proposed variables to consider in allocating prospective primary health care pharmaceutical budgets to districts in Uganda are: district outpatient department attendance per capita, total district population, total number of government health facilities in the district and the district human poverty index.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 4%
France 1 4%
Unknown 26 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 25%
Unspecified 5 18%
Librarian 4 14%
Other 3 11%
Researcher 3 11%
Other 6 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 32%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 5 18%
Unspecified 4 14%
Social Sciences 3 11%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 7%
Other 5 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 April 2015.
All research outputs
#7,550,831
of 12,521,542 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#123
of 159 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,655
of 227,549 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,521,542 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 159 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 227,549 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them