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Evidence for short-time divergence and long-time conservation of tissue-specific expression after gene duplication

Overview of attention for article published in Briefings in Bioinformatics, April 2011
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Title
Evidence for short-time divergence and long-time conservation of tissue-specific expression after gene duplication
Published in
Briefings in Bioinformatics, April 2011
DOI 10.1093/bib/bbr022
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. Huerta-Cepas, J. Dopazo, M. A. Huynen, T. Gabaldon

Abstract

Gene duplication is one of the main mechanisms by which genomes can acquire novel functions. It has been proposed that the retention of gene duplicates can be associated to processes of tissue expression divergence. These models predict that acquisition of divergent expression patterns should be acquired shortly after the duplication, and that larger divergence in tissue expression would be expected for paralogs, as compared to orthologs of a similar age. Many studies have shown that gene duplicates tend to have divergent expression patterns and that gene family expansions are associated with high levels of tissue specificity. However, the timeframe in which these processes occur have rarely been investigated in detail, particularly in vertebrates, and most analyses do not include direct comparisons of orthologs as a baseline for the expected levels of tissue specificity in absence of duplications. To assess the specific contribution of duplications to expression divergence, we combine here phylogenetic analyses and expression data from human and mouse. In particular, we study differences in spatial expression among human-mouse paralogs, specifically duplicated after the radiation of mammals, and compare them to pairs of orthologs in the same species. Our results show that gene duplication leads to increased levels of tissue specificity and that this tends to occur promptly after the duplication event.

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The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Spain 2 2%
Brazil 2 2%
Colombia 1 1%
France 1 1%
Czechia 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Argentina 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 77 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 27 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 27%
Student > Master 9 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 5%
Student > Bachelor 5 5%
Other 13 14%
Unknown 8 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 52 57%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 18%
Computer Science 3 3%
Environmental Science 1 1%
Mathematics 1 1%
Other 5 5%
Unknown 13 14%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 December 2012.
All research outputs
#14,137,641
of 22,653,392 outputs
Outputs from Briefings in Bioinformatics
#1,519
of 2,564 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,358
of 109,055 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Briefings in Bioinformatics
#10
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,653,392 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,564 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 109,055 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.